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Courses - Spring 2018
ISRL
Israel Studies
ISRL249G
Selected Topics in Israel Studies; Introduction to Jewish Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Also offered as JWST272 and CMLT242. Credit only granted for JWST272, CMLT242, or ISRL249G. A survey of Jewish literature and introduction to methods of reading literature in general and Jewish literature in particular. Concern with what makes a literary corpus Jewish and other issues of canonicity. All texts in English translation.
ISRL329D
Special Topics in Israel Studies; Understanding the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict through Opposing Histories
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Not open to students who have taken ISRL289I. Credit will be granted for HONR338A or ISRL329D. Israelis and Palestinians have been fighting over the Land of Palestine/Israel for over a century, but both sides date their relationship to the Land back many centuries, even millenia. We will look at the history but especially the "narratives" that the two sides employ to explain and justify, both to themselves and others, their claims to the land, and how these narratives have both molded the shape of the conflict and been molded by it, and changed over time. This is not solely a history course, though it will cover the relevant history. It will focus on the importance of narratives to the continuation of the conflict, as well as elements relating to identity, religion, archaeology, morality, and human rights. No previous knowledge is expected, but those with such knowledge will find it useful.
ISRL329K
Special Topics in Israel Studies; Jewry of Muscle: Zionism and Jewish Masculinity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as JWST319K. Credit granted for JWST319K or ISRL329K. Part of the Zionist cultural project involved creating a new Jewish masculinity that would replace the diasporic sissy Jew with a strong, healthy new Jewry of Muscle. Using literary and filmic sources, we will analyze how these Zionist and Israeli cultural productions served to build (and sometimes undermine) this new model of Jewish masculinity.
ISRL329M
Special Topics in Israel Studies; Mizrahi Identity in Israel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
It is impossible to understand Israeli society today without examining the Mizrahi experience.Despite the common misconceptionthat most Israelis are of European origin, the fact of the matter is that Jews of Mizrahi origin, whose parents and grandparentsimmigrated to Israel from the Middle East and North Africa,represent a major part of the Israeli population. Moreover, Ashkenazi-Mizrahi relationscontinue to be a major source of tension in Israelisociety and politics. This course brings to light narratives of Mizrahiidentity in Israel and explores the trajectory of the Mizrahi struggle for equality through its various milestones: the 1959 Wadi Salib Revolt, the Black Panthers Movement in the 1970s, the emergence of the Israeli Sephardi-Orthodox party Shas, and the new wave of Mizrahiactivism in the 21st century. Additionally, the course explores literature,film and television to uncover the way Mizrahi Jews narrate their story in Israel today. Also offered as HIST329Z and JWST319D. Credit only granted for HIST329Z, ISRL329M, or JWST319D.
ISRL342
History of Modern Israel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS
Also offered as: HIST376.
Credit only granted for: HIST376, ISRL342, or JWST342.
Formerly: JWST342.
History of modern Israel since the beginning of the Zionist settlement in 1882. Attention to different interpretations and narratives of Israel's history, including the historical and ideological roots of Zionism, the establishment of the State of Israel, ideological forces, wars, and the triumphs and crises of democracy.
Additional Note: Also offered as HIST376. Credit granted for ISRL342 or HIST376.
ISRL343
Global Migration and the Israeli Case Study
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP
Credit only granted for: ISRL349K, GVPT368G, SOCY398G, SOCY398I, or ISRL343.
Formerly: ISRL349K.
Over 70% of Israel's population is made of first, second or third generation immigrants, who came from over 70 countries, making Israel an ultimate immigrant society. This course will focus on the history of Israel as a case study for the understanding of the historical phenomena of modern immigration.
Also offered as SOCY398G.
ISRL349C
Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; The history of urbanization and urban culture in Israel
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Urbanization in Mandatory Palestine and the State of Israel from World War I to the present, analyzing the unique Israeli urban experience, Jewish and Arabs, as well as the shared experience of the two nations. Focus on Tel Aviv, Jaffa and the metropolitan area of Gush Dan.
ISRL349M
Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Israeli Society through History, Sociology and Art
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Also offered as SOCY398I. Credit granted for ISRL349M or SOCY398I.

The prolonged conflict with the Palestinians and Araband states and Israeli occupation of the west bank for almost 50 years, had an impact on militarism, political life, centrality oft religious-secular relations, gender relations and the Israeli culture as a whole. We will examine the way art and cinema has dealt, with certain cultural issues and what sociology can contribute to our knowledge.
ISRL349V
Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; The Arab-Israeli Conflict Through Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Also offered as ARAB398F and FILM335. Credit granted for FILM335, ARAB398F or ISRL349V How does the Arab-Israeli Conflict represent itself? How do the actors within this conflict (and some from outside) come to understand this conflict by representing it to themselves? The prism of film will touch on many of the various discourses (history, society, culture). The course will investigate whether the medium of film represents and formulates this Conflict in a particular way.
ISRL448A
Seminar in Israel Studies; Understanding Israeli Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
The course objective is to understand the complexities of Israeli politics. We will explore the origins of the Israeli policy, the constitutional structure, and the main political agents and look at the role of political parties, the Knesset (Parliament), the Cabinet, and the electoral behavior of various ethnic groups. The course will emphasize Israel leaders, past and present, and the role of the military and the media in the political process. We will also examine some political crisis and scandals.
ISRL448Q
Seminar in Israel Studies; The Holy City and the Holy Mountain: a Sociological look at the Old City of Jerusalem and the Temple Mount
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
An exploration of Jerusalem's Old City as the home of multiple holy places and of 20,000 people of varied and ancient communities through archaeology, religion, geography, politics, and, especially using sociological tools, as well as an examination of current conflicts.

Also offered as SOCY398Q. Credit granted for ISRL448Q or SOCY398Q.
ISRL448V
Seminar in Israel Studies; The New Theater of Terror: Online Terrorism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
This course examines the relationships between modern terrorists and the new media, how terrorists use the online platforms, how democracies can respond to the challenge, and what are the prices of various measures.

Also offered as BSST338Y. Credit granted for BSST338Y or ISRL448V.
ISRL448W
Seminar in Israel Studies; 1948 and The Transnational Struggle for Palestine
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
Prerequisite: ARAB305 or HEBR313 (or permission from instructor.) Also offered as JWST429O, HEBR498M, HIST419Y, and ARAB499Y. Credit granted for ISRL448W, JWST429O, HEBR498M, HIST419Y, or ARAB499Y. An exploration of the 1948 War for Palestine/Israel and its reverberations throughout the Middle East and North Africa. For students who have advanced proficiency in EITHER Hebrew or Arabic, this class offers a unique perspective on this seminal war through readings of original documents written by the war participants, both Jewish and Arab. Students can expect to improve their translation and reading comprehension skills in Hebrew or Arabic. Class discussions as well as a final research paper will be in English.