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Courses - Fall 2016
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC275
Introduction to Veterinary Medical Science and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP
Prerequisite: BSCI105; or (BSCI170 and BSCI171).
The fundamentals of clinical veterinary medical practice and the research that supports it. Topics presented will include the histology, gross anatomy and physiology of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, digestive, renal and neurological systems as they relate to the description of specific disease states taught in this course. Additionally, examples of diseases caused by pathologic disturbances to these systems will be discussed, as well as the basic principles of preventative health care, diagnostic testing and pharmacologic intervention. Significant attention will be given to research in veterinary science and the practice of evidence-based medicine. This course is intended for any student interested in veterinary medicine, animal physiology, or medical science.
AOSC
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
AOSC123
Causes and Implications of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Also offered as: GEOL123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Formerly: METO123.
Responsible policy and decision making on issues related to the global environment requires understanding of the basic scientific issues, relationships between the geophysical and biological sciences, the impacts on regional and global endeavors, and the political manner in which humans respond. This course embodies an integrated introduction to the broad scientific and social aspects of the global change problem.
AOSC200
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
Formerly: METO200.
Broad survey of the state of knowledge and problems of atmospheric science. Origin and structure of the atmosphere, meteorological observations, weather maps, forecasting, satellites, energetics, wind, general circulation, storms, severe weather, climate change, air pollution.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC200
The Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem: Intersection of Science, Economics, and Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
The Chesapeake Bay is one of the most studied and monitored ecosystems in the world. To develop effective policies to restore this system to a healthier status requires integrating what we know about the biological and physical properties of the system with our understanding of the human dimension. Issues such as achieving nutrient reduction goals, restoring healthy blue crab and oyster fisheries in the bay will be used to demonstrate how economics interacts with science to guide policies that can be effective in achieving Bay restoration goals.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR100
Introduction to Astronomy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Credit only granted for: ASTR100, ASTR101, or ASTR120.
An elementary course in descriptive astronomy, especially appropriate for non-science students. Topics include the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, and nebulae, galaxies, and evolution of the Universe.
ASTR120
Introductory Astrophysics - Solar System
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH140.
Restriction: Must not have completed ASTR101 or ASTR100.
Credit only granted for: ASTR100, ASTR101, or ASTR120.
For students majoring in astronomy or with a strong interest in science Topics include development of astronomy, planetary orbits, electromagnetic radiation, telescopes as well as constituents and origin of the solar system (planets, satellites, comets, asteroids, meteoroids, etc.).
ASTR230
The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH115 or higher; or MATH113.
Have you ever wondered if humans will ever terraform Mars or Europa so we could live there without a spacesuit? Has it ever crossed your mind how lucky you are that you live on a water-rich planet with an oxygen-rich atmosphere? Have you ever suspected novelists and scriptwriters of creating ridiculous planets that violate scientific laws? Does the fate of our planet's thin biosphere keep you up at night? How common is life in the Universe? These are difficult questions, but armed with the right information, you can answer all of them. The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems will help you develop a deeper understanding of why planets are the way they are. Along the way, you'll see examples of mistakes made in classic science fiction movies, novels and short stories and get the chance to invent your own plausible planets!
ASTR300
Stars and Stellar Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: ASTR100 or ASTR101; and completion of the CORE Distributive Studies requirement in Mathematics and Sciences or General Education Fundamental Studies requirement in Mathematics. Or permission of CMNS-Astronomy department.
Designed primarily for non-science majors. Study of stars-types, properties, evolution, and distribution in space; supernovae, pulsars, and black holes.
ASTR330
Solar System Astronomy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: ASTR100 or ASTR101; and completion of the CORE Distributive Studies requirement in Mathematics and Sciences or the General Education Fundamental Studies requirement in Mathematics. Or permission of CMNS-Astronomy department.
Credit only granted for: ASTR330 or GEOL212.
Designed primarily for non-science majors. The structure of planets and of their atmospheres, the nature of comets, asteroids, and satellites. Comparison of various theories for the origin of the solar system. Emphasis on a description of recent data and interpretation.
ASTR340
Origin of the Universe
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: ASTR100 or ASTR101; and completion of the CORE Distributive Studies requirement in Mathematics and Sciences or General Education Fundamental Studies requirement in Mathematics. Or permission of CMNS-Astronomy department.
Designed primarily for non-science majors. A study of our progression of knowledge about the universe. Topics include: early cosmological models, geocentric vs. heliocentric theory, curvature of space, Hubble's Law, Big Bang Theory, microwave background radiation, evolution of stars and galaxies, dark matter, active galaxies, quasars and the future of the universe.
ASTR380
Life in the Universe - Astrobiology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Designed primarily for non-science majors. Study of the astronomical perspective on the conditions for the origin and existence of life in the universe.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI160
Principles of Ecology and Evolution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with BSCI161) or DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH120 or higher.
Restriction: For Science Majors.
Credit only granted for: BSCI106 or BSCI160.
Formerly: BSCI106.
Basic principles of biology with special emphasis on ecological and evolutionary biology.
BSCI170
Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with BSCI171) or DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH120 or higher.
Recommended: For Science majors.
Credit only granted for: BSCI105 or BSCI170.
Formerly: BSCI105.
Basic principles of biology with special emphasis on cellular and molecular biology.
ENMA
Engineering, Materials Department Site
ENMA150
Materials of Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
The discovery of new materials has shaped history and built civilizations. The utilization, properties and production techniques of materials from the Bronze Age up through modern times and into the future will be traced. These materials are explained by considering their atomic structure, the binding forces between atoms and their arrangement, and how controlling the structure controls the materials properties.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
ENSP
Environmental Science and Policy Department Site
ENSP101
Introduction to Environmental Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
One of two required courses that introduce students to the topics studied and methods employed in environmental science and policy. Emphasis on scientific ways of knowing; the systems, cycles, flows, and interfaces that characterize the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere; the analysis of human impacts on these systems; and the nature of scientific uncertainty and methods of quantifying environmental processes.
ENST
Environmental Science and Technology Department Site
ENST233
Introduction to Environmental Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
How humans are affected by the quality of our air, water, soil, and foo supply as well as how human activities altered these survival necessities are examined. Students will learn how the evolution and prosperity of human populations have resulted in degradation of our environment and the impact of environmental degradation on the health of people.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG140
Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common i this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.
GEOG170
Introduction to Methods of Geospatial Intelligence and Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Introduction to technical methods used in gathering, analyzing, and presenting geospatial information, addressing the needs of geospatial analysis, such as environmental monitoring, situational awareness, disaster management, and human systems. Topics include basics of locational reference systems, map projections, satellite and airborne remote sensing, global positioning systems, geographic information systems, cartography, and introductory statistics and probability. The course is a gateway to more advanced technical classes in geoinformatics.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL104
Dinosaurs: A Natural History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Dinosaurs, their evolution, and our understanding of their fossil record. Students will examine the geologic record and the tools used by paleontologists to determine: geologic ages and ancient environments; evolutionary history and extinctions; dinosaurian biology and behavior; and their survival as birds. Mechanisms of global change ranging from plate tectonics to asteroid impact will be discussed.
GEOL120
Environmental Geology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Credit only granted for: GEOL100 or GEOL120.
A review of geologic factors underlying many environmental problems and the interactions between population and physical environment: geologic hazards, land-use planning, conservation, mineral resources, waste disposal, land reclamation, and the geologic aspects of health and disease. The course is aimed at lower division students in education and liberal arts, and should be useful to any student concerned with geologic perspectives of environmental problems.
GEOL123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Also offered as: AOSC123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
GEOL124
(Perm Req)
Evolution of Life and Environment on Planet Earth
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
An exploration of how life has shaped Earth's physical environments, both in the contemporary Earth and over the long course of Earth history. Topics range from evidence for the origin and diversification of life and its impact on Earth environments to the mind-set and methods of the scientists who interpret it, and what those methods tell us about future interactions between life and the environment, both on Earth and in the Solar System.
Restricted to students in the new Carillon Once and Future Planet living learning community.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
GEOL200
Earth's Fury: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsunami
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunami frequently remind us of th dangers associated with living on a constantly changing planet. How do people prepare for these rare but dramatic events? Student will study the science behind earthquakes and volcanoes, how it guides monitoring, forecasting, prevention, and response, and the cultural and ethical aspects of these events.
GEOL212
Planetary Geology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Credit only granted for: ASTR330 or GEOL212.
An examination of the geologic and geochemical processes at work in the solar system from the perspectives supplied by space age exploration of the planets and other solar system bodies.
HONR
HONR209O
The Science of Sleep and Biological Rhythms
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
HONR228G
Honors Seminar; Food Ethics: You Gonna Eat That?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR229L
Honors Seminar; Climate Change: Science, Economics, and Governance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR238F
Honors Seminar: From Animal Thoughts to Animal Feelings: Cognitive and Applied Ethology's Understanding of Animals
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
HONR238I
Honors Seminar; Eating with Eyes Wide Open
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR238Q
Honors Seminar; Nuclear Waste: The Other Consequences of Nuclear Weapons
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR268N
(Perm Req)
Honors Seminar; Cracking the Secrets of the Universe Using Computers: Re-discovering the Higgs and Searching for Invisible Matter
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
This course is part of a two-semester Honors research seminar. Part two of this series will be offered in the Spring 2017 Semester. For more information about the course, please visit physics.umd.edu/courses/Honr268N/. For permission to enroll, please contact Dr. Shabnam Jabeen at Jabeen@umd.edu.
HONR269V
Honors Seminar; Virus Hunting: Emerging Diseases, Social Controversies and Nano-Technologies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS
HONR278K
Honors Seminar; Evolutionary Processes in Health Medicine
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR289N
Honors Seminar; Physical Activity in Health and Human Performance: From Fat to Fit to Olympic Gold
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES260
Science of Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSNS
Course details (1) the public health importance of and the processes underlying cardiovascular disease, (2) the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the methods whereby they were identified, and (3) the principles of the scientific evidence supporting the use of physical activity to prevent cardiovascular disease.
KNES289W
Topical Investigations; The Cybernetic Human
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Can the profound and rapid technological advances experienced in the 21st century change what it means to be human or the nature of humanity? Emergent technologies, new materials, increased computer power,engineering innovations, and groundbreaking work in the sciences of cognition and action provide myriad opportunities for repairing and enhancing the human body and brain. Examines the ethical, social, and technological implications of an increasing synergism of technology and the body in sports and the arts, at work or home, rehabilitating the body and the brain, and society at large.
NFSC
Nutrition and Food Science Department Site
The following courses may involve the use of animals. Students who are concerned about the use of animals in teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, prior to course enrollment, to determine whether animals are to be used in the course, whether class exercises involving animals are optional or required and what alternatives, if any, are available.
NFSC100
Elements of Nutrition
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Fundamentals of human nutrition. Nutrient requirements related to changing individual and family needs.
NFSC100H
Elements of Nutrition
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Fundamentals of human nutrition. Nutrient requirements related to changing individual and family needs.
For general honors students only.
NFSC112
Food: Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Introduction to the realm of food science, food technology and food processing. An overview of the largest industry in the U.S. with emphasis on the science of food and the technology of food preservation from harvest through processing and packaging to distribution and consumer utilization.
PHYS
Physics Department Site
PHYS105
Physics for Decision Makers: Global Energy Crisis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
This marquee course will consider the global energy crisis from a scientific perspective. Topics include basic laws of energy and thermodynamics, their effects on energy production and distribution, greenhouse gas, global warming and policy options for decision makers. This course is aimed at the non-science major.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
PHYS161
General Physics: Mechanics and Particle Dynamics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH141.
Credit only granted for: PHYS141, PHYS161, or PHYS171.
First semester of a three-semester calculus-based general physics course. Laws of motion, force, and energy; principles of mechanics, collisions, linear momentum, rotation, and gravitation.
Physics clinic, PHY 1214, MTWHF 11, 2. If purchasing used books additional software may be required.
PHYS171
Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Relativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: (MATH140; and a high school physics course); or permission of CMNS-Physics department. And must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH141.
Credit only granted for: PHYS141, PHYS161, or PHYS171.
First semester of a three semester sequence for physics majors and those desiring a rigorous preparation in the physical sciences: kinematics, Newton's laws, energy and work, linear and angular momenta, temperature and pressure, ideal gas law, and special relativity.
Also offered as PHYS 171H.
PHYS171H
(Perm Req)
Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Relativity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: (MATH140; and a high school physics course); or permission of CMNS-Physics department. And must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH141.
Credit only granted for: PHYS141, PHYS161, or PHYS171.
First semester of a three semester sequence for physics majors and those desiring a rigorous preparation in the physical sciences: kinematics, Newton's laws, energy and work, linear and angular momenta, temperature and pressure, ideal gas law, and special relativity.
Also offered as PHYS171.
PHYS199M
The Manhattan Project
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSNS, SCIS
This course explores the development of the atomic bomb during the Manhattan project. Nuclear Physics is introduced in a historical context from the discovery of radioactivity in 1896 to the discovery of nuclear fission in Germany in 1938; this historical approach allows students to understand how scientific knowledge is built up over time.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
PLSC
Plant Sciences
PLSC115
How Safe is Your Salad? The Microbiological Safety of Fresh produce
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Recommended: PLSC100, PLSC101, or BSCI105; or (BSCI170 and BSCI171).
As food is produced in larger quantities and made to travel longer distances, keeping our food safe in this day and age is an ever growing challenge. This course will focus on the question of what it takes to grow and maintain safe fruits and vegetables, as food travels along the path from the farm to your fork. Food safety of fresh produce will be discussed from the public health, agricultural, economical and policy perspectives.
PLSC120
Mushrooms and Molds
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Students will learn about how essential fungi (mushroom, molds, and alikes) are in this world and how they affect our daily lives. They will learn how fungi interact with animals, plants and other organisms in positive and negative ways. Also, they will study the importance of fungi in biotechnology and food and how they have shaped many societies throughout history.
PLSC125
Feeding Nine Billion by 2050: Food Security and Crop Protection
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
A big question in global food security is "how can we feed 9 billion people in 2050?" This course will stimulate creative thinking about possible solutions particularly from the crop production perspective. The instructor will introduce the concept of food security and different dimensions of this complex issue, identify major constraints to food security, and discuss scientific approaches that may be used to meet the grand challenge. Emphasis will be placed on topical and controversial issues such as the impact of biofuel production and GM crops on food security, and novel strategies that can enhance crop protection for improving food security.
PLSC203
Plants, Genes and Biotechnology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: BSCI103 or BSCI105; or (BSCI170 and BSCI171).
An overview of the history, genetics, and reproductive mechanisms for agronomic and horticultural plants that examines mechanisms of genetic improvement ranging from traditional plant breeding to tissue culture and genetic engineering. Social and political issues such as germplasm preservation and international intellectual property rights will also be discussed.
PSYC
Psychology Department Site
The following courses may involve the use of animals. Students who are concerned about the use of animals in teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, prior to course enrollment, to determine whether animals are to be used in the course, whether class exercises involving animals are optional or required and what alternatives, if any, are available.
The Department of Psychology enforces course prerequisites. Students who do not meet the course prerequisites will be administratively dropped from the course.
PSYC100
Introduction to Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSNS
A basic introductory course, intended to bring the student into contact with the major problems confronting psychology and the more important attempts at their solution.
Discussion sections do not meet until after first lecture. Research requirement: may involve participation in research.
PSYC301
Biological Basis of Behavior
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS
Prerequisite: PSYC100. And BSCI170 and BSCI171; or BSCI105.
An introduction to the anatomical structures and physiological processe that determine behavior. After a study of the basic functioning of the nervous system, the course will examine the acquisition and processing of sensory information, the neural control of movement, and the biological bases of complex behaviors such as sleep, learning, memory, sex, language, and addiction.
Restricted to PSYC (major code 20010) students only.