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Courses - Spring 2017
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP187
The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: AASP100.
Students will examine the birth of the racial caste system following the abolition of slavery, the parallels between the racial hierarchy of the Jim Crow system and contemporary mass incarceration, and the rise of the prison industrial complex as a multi-billon business which thrives on the oppression of low-income populations and poor communities of color.
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST120
Race, Gender, and the Global Economy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An exploration of the building blocks of the global economy (e.g. free trade, financial institutions) in relation to racial and gender difference, hierarchies, and ideologies.
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC227
Eating with Eyes Wide Open
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Students will investigate the tension that is created by trade-offs that, knowingly or not, are made by consumers relative to agricultural production methods and dietary choices. Course will inform students about their food supply so they can make informed decisions and practice intentional or informed eating.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH265
Anthropology of Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An overview of the growing field of global health including health care systems, medical practices, ideas about illness in cross-cultural contexts, issues of health development, global health inequity, and human rights issues. The course will focus on the history of global health, the critique of major international health agencies and their development paradigms, and the political economy of social inequalities and health.
ANTH266
Changing Climate, Changing Cultures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Explore past, present, and future interactions between humans and climate. Discussions, methods-oriented activities, and case study analyses provide students a foundation for appreciating the role of anthropology in understanding, responding to, and preparing for climate change.
ANTH323
Plagues, Pathogens and Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ANTH429A or ANTH323.
Formerly: ANTH429A.
The impact of diseases on populations from prehistoric times through the present will be examined, along with public perceptions of disease, scientific breakthroughs on treatment and prevention, and the ways that politics and public health policies can enhance or impede the advancement of disease treatment. The natural history of disease, population structure, and immunity will be discussed. The class will address emerging and re-emerging diseases and the ways that first responders, researchers, and policy makers may affect the outcome of an outbreak.
AOSC
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
AOSC123
Causes and Implications of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Also offered as: GEOL123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Formerly: METO123.
Responsible policy and decision making on issues related to the global environment requires understanding of the basic scientific issues, relationships between the geophysical and biological sciences, the impacts on regional and global endeavors, and the political manner in which humans respond. This course embodies an integrated introduction to the broad scientific and social aspects of the global change problem.
AOSC200
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
Formerly: METO200.
Broad survey of the state of knowledge and problems of atmospheric science. Origin and structure of the atmosphere, meteorological observations, weather maps, forecasting, satellites, energetics, wind, general circulation, storms, severe weather, climate change, air pollution.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH289I
Sustainability at College Park
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
ARTT
Art Studio Department Site
ARTT260
Dangerous Art: Censorship or Subsidy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Combines a broad historical analysis of the relationship between art and authority with an examination of contemporary culture criticism and art practice. Explores the uses and abuses of art and culture in totalitarianand theocratic states as a prelude to a review of the role of official culture in the United States. Examines art and culture in the public arena and many related areas where the arts and policy interact.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR220
Collisions in Space - The Threat of Asteroid Impacts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Restriction: Must not be in Astronomy program.
Additional information: Course is open to Astronomy and Planetary Sciences minors.
Appropriate for non-science majors. Worried? Can't sleep? Collisions in Space will evaluate the threat of asteroid impacts with the Earth using knowledge of asteroid characteristics and orbits. The merits of possible defense plans will be discussed, as well as the budgetary and political concerns associated with implementing any such plan.
ASTR230
The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH115 or higher; or MATH113.
Have you ever wondered if humans will ever terraform Mars or Europa so we could live there without a spacesuit? Has it ever crossed your mind how lucky you are that you live on a water-rich planet with an oxygen-rich atmosphere? Have you ever suspected novelists and scriptwriters of creating ridiculous planets that violate scientific laws? Does the fate of our planet's thin biosphere keep you up at night? How common is life in the Universe? These are difficult questions, but armed with the right information, you can answer all of them. The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems will help you develop a deeper understanding of why planets are the way they are. Along the way, you'll see examples of mistakes made in classic science fiction movies, novels and short stories and get the chance to invent your own plausible planets!
BMGT
Business and Management Department Site
BMGT289A
Social Enterprise: Changing the World through Innovation and Transformative Action
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
BMGT289B
How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit will be granted for only one of the following: BMGT289B or HONR289P. Evening guest speakers 6:30pm-9:15pm are on specific dates. Daytime meetings will be held every week.
BMGT289D
Frauds, Scams, and Thefts: What, How and Why?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
BMGT289E
Entrepreneurial Thinking for Non-Business Majors: How Not to Miss Great Opportunities Your Life Throws at You
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
BMGT289F
Is America Destined to Fall by 2076?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
BMGT289I
Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
BMGT289L
The Proper Role of Government in a Free Enterprise System
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI223
General Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI170 and BSCI171; or BSCI105.
Fundamental concepts in morphology, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to medicine, the food industry and biotechnology.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG) Students must pay a $40.00 lab materials fee.
BSCI283
Principles of Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI207 and BSCI222.
Credit only granted for: BSCI223 or BSCI283.
Additional information: Priority given to BSCI, BCHM and CHEM majors.
Introduction to microorganisms designed for science majors. Genetic principles underlying microbial abilities; microbial structure-function relationships; metabolism, physiology, and ecology of microorganisms; interactions between microorganisms (including pathogens) and their hosts.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG). Students must pay a $40.00 lab materials fee.
BSOS
Behavioral and Social Sciences
BSOS388B
(Perm Req)
Behavioral and Social Sciences Special Topics; Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Also offered as HONR348D and PUAF388D. Credit will be granted for BSOS388B, HONR348D or PUAF388D.

This is a BSOS Solutions Lab and a Fearless Ideas course offered in collaboration with PUAF388D and HONR348D. Explore the many mechanisms for achieving social impact through social innovation. This is team-based, highly interactive and dynamic course, that provides an opportunity for students to generate solutions to a wide range of problems facing many communities today. This course deepens the students understanding of entrepreneurship and innovation practices by guiding them through the creation and implementation process as applied to a project idea of their choice. These projects serve as the laboratory to implement topics such as design systems thinking, developing and communicating a strategy and goals, project management and implementation skills, teamwork and talent management, fundraising and revenue generation, marketing and partner development, leadership skills and project sustainability. For more information, visit dogood.umd.edu. For permission to register email bsos-ugdean@umd.edu.

A Fearless Ideas Course from the Academy for Innovation & Entrepreneurship (AIE): http://ter.ps/iamFEARLESS Click here for more information on the Fearless Ideas Courses.

Click here for more course information on the BSOS Solutions Lab.
BSST
Terrorism Studies
BSST334
States of Emergency
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Students will explore the manner in which crises unfold from the perspective of a variety of emergency response disciplines, including: emergency management, law enforcement, intelligence analysis, cyber analysis, risk communication, health and human services, and emergency psychiatry/psychology. Students will participate in a semester-long simulation of an unfolding terrorist attack.
Students will be required to pay a laboratory fee of $50, in addition to purchasing a textbook.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS225
Responses to Violence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Conflict is unfortunately resolved through violence in a number of settings. It ranges from interpersonal to international in its scope. This course investigates the strengths and weakness of a number of resolutions to reducing violence over the course of history using both state centered and informal control.
CCJS325
Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CCJS325 or CCJS498R.
Formerly: CCJS498R.
The trafficking of human beings in its historical, legal, economic, political and social contexts. Scope of the global problem, different forms of human trafficking, and regional trends and practices. Roles of government, the international community and individual actors. Strategies to combat trafficking.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS289A
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
America, from its very origins as an independent nation, saw itself as the new Rome: our system of government is built on Roman precedents, our national buildings look as if they came from the Roman Forum, and our leisure activities take us to stadiums modeled on the Colosseum. Our relationship to Rome, however, raises our greatest anxiety: will America fall as Rome did? In 1776, the year of American independence, Edward Gibbon published his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire ; America has been thinking about the trajectory of our history alongside Rome's from the very beginning.
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS225
College Park Scholars Capstone: Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS100.
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program.
Formerly: CPSP227.
Exploration and understanding of ways science and technology shape and are shaped by society.
CPSS240
College Park Scholars: Science, Technology & Society - Service-Learning Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS101; or permission of instructor.
Restriction: Matriculation into the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program; or permission of instructor.
Supervised Service-Learning practicum in issues related to science, technology and society.
Robotics Service-Learning in K-12 Schools.
ECON
Economics Department Site
ECON111
Thinking Like an Economist
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Sophomore standing or lower; or permission of BSOS-Economics department.
An introduction to the modes of thought of economics. Use of simple standard tools of economics to analyze important problems that arise frequently in public policy, the news media, and in daily life. An emphasis on how economists predict what choices societies make and how economists analyze whether those are good choices. Practical application of a variety of economic tools leading to a focus on the essential unity underlying these analytical tools, viewing economics as a discipline that applies a core methodology in different ways in different situations.
ECON155
Economics & the College Affordability Crisis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Additional information: No background in economics is required, although this course could be a nice complement for ECON200 and ECON201.
Why have tuition and fees increased substantially over the past 30 years at almost all institutions of higher education in the US? How can quality and productivity be measured in schools? Why do most students pay considerably less than the actual cost of service provision? What is society's interest in devoting considerable resources to education beyond the high school level? How do existing and proposed governmental policies impact both the number of students pursuing a college education and the cost of this education? ECON155 uses tools from economics to examine and explore answers to these and other related questions.
EDCI
Curriculum and Instruction Department Site
EDCI246
Good Stories: Teaching Narratives for Peace and Justice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Through the study and use of oral storytelling and digital technologies explore qualities and characteristics of what makes a good story and how stories can be used to advance peace and justice on both individual and social levels.
EDCI288C
Special Topics in Teacher Education; The Power of the Tongue: Linguistic Profiling, Dialect and Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD231
Inside 21st Century Creativity: How Creative Ideas, Concepts, and Products are Generated
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Mechanisms of the creative mind. Psychological, social, sociological, developmental, cultural, educational, genetic and neural based roots of creativity.
EDHD310
Your Brain on Education: The Neuroscience of Learning and Development
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: PSYC100.
Investigation linking research in the brain science of learning and development, including the neural basis of academic skills, to achievement, disability, and broader applications to classroom learning. This course will focus on areas of education including language (spoken and written), conceptual change, numerical/quantitative processing, and social cognition as well as burgeoning areas of neuroscientific research in general cognitive processes such as attention, memory, and executive processing. These topics will be discussed with respect to typical and atypical development with some focus on developmental disabilities including autism, specific language impairment, reading and math impairment, and attention deficit disorders among others. This course will focus on both the theoretical perspectives and pragmatic issues of how evidence regarding brain development can or may be translated into useful or misleading information for educators, professionals, and parents/guardians of our children.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP289I
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL120
Acting Human: Shakespeare and the Drama of Identity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL120 or ENGL289I.
Formerly: ENGL289I.
Shakespeare's ideas of dramatic realism studied through close examination of literary and dramatic techniques. How Shakespeare generates the fiction of a living, thinking person in the space of five acts, and how readers participate in the making of that fiction. Some attention to Shakespeare on film and what the playwright can teach us about different media.
ENGL125
Why Poetry Matters
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL125 or ENGL289P.
Formerly: ENGL289P.
Introduction to the formal fundamentals of poetry and exploration of the role poetry plays in how we think about the human condition; what constitutes knowledge and wisdom, interior subjectivity and communal identity; and how this knowledge is to be used in confronting new challenges and the perennial questions: how to live with oneself, and as oneself; in time, and with others; here, where we reside; and elsewhere, where we imagine ourselves going.
ENGL142
Literary Maryland
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL142 or ENGL289M.
Formerly: ENGL289M.
What does the literature of Maryland teach us about our state's past, present, and future? "Literary Maryland" explores this question by taking students on a tour of our state's prose, poetry, and drama from colonization to the present. In addition to reading fascinating writing and visiting interesting places, you'll learn how the Chesapeake was formed; why nobody sings the entire national anthem; and what led Baltimore to name its football team after a poem written by a Virginian.
ENGL144
Breaking News: Contemporary Literature, Media and the State
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL144 or ENGL289X.
Formerly: ENGL289X.
How specific moments of social upheaval are portrayed in media and transformed into art. Developing skills of reading, writing, and interpretation by learning how to "decode" fiction, t.v., news, and films. Exploration of viewpoints not represented in mainstream media. Question dominant discourses and examine how narratives are fabricated. What does it mean to be "subject" to the State, and how does art subvert it? Multimedia component deals with war, terrorism, environment, human rights, biomedical research, geopolitics.
ENMA
Engineering, Materials Department Site
ENMA289A
Bigger, Faster, Better: The Quest for Absolute Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
ENST
Environmental Science and Technology Department Site
ENST140
Sustainability and History: The Maryland Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Examines the changing nature of concern over sustainability through the environmental history of the state of Maryland. The historical approach, supplemented by discussion of the basic scientific processes underlying ecosystem functions and human impacts on the environment, reveals both enduring and changing qualities of the search for sustainable patterns of living, beginning before 17th century European contact and continuing on into the environmental concerns of our own time.
Also offered as HIST189B. Credit Granted for HIST189B or ENST140.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC170
Future of Families: Issues and Controversies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: FMSC170 or FMSC298F.
Formerly: FMSC298F.
Examination of current trends and controversial issues in family life, including issues of marriage, reproductive technologies, adoption, child custody, remarriage, and marital violence.
FMSC190
Man Up! Where Are The Fathers?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of changing fatherhood roles, health, and inequality in diverse families. Focus will be on masculinities and disparities among men by race and class; provider role expectations; and trauma and violence faced by men in contemporary society.
GEMS
Gemstone
GEMS104
Topics in Science, Technology and Society (STS)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU or DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: GEMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Gemstone program.
An examination of how cultural, economic, political and social forces shape scientific and technological systems and, conversely, how scientific and technological systems have affected the culture, economies, organization and politics of societies. Students in the course will form small teams to carry out semester-long research on socio/technical topics related to the course theme chosen for that specific semester.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG140
Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common i this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Also offered as: AOSC123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
GEOL204
Dinosaurs, Early Humans, Ancestors, and Evolution; The Fossil Record of Vanished Worlds of the Prehistoric Past
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Examination of evidence used to reconstruct critical events in the history of life by looking at case studies of significant evolutionary origins, transitions, and extinctions; addressing the role of paleontology in human society, including science education, conservation, and the media.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT202
Politics, Constitutional Policy, and the Institution of the U.S. Supreme Court
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
A thorough examination of the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. Focusing on the Court as an institution-the set of norms, rules, and policymaking processes that lead to the Supreme Court's decisions-and how justices' decision-making processes critically determine substantive legal policy and the meaning of the U.S. Constitution.
GVPT289J
Special Topics in Government and Politics; Uncertain Partners: US & China in a Changing World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
GVPT289O
Special Topics in Government and Politics; Racial and Ethnic Politics in the Obama Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS208A
Seminar in Cybersecurity; Accounting and Economic Aspects of Cybersecurity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
HACS208P
Seminar in Cybersecurity; Beyond Technology, the Policy Implications of Cyberspace
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
HACS208Y
Seminar in Cybersecurity; Cyber Psychology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
HISP
Historic Preservation
HISP200
The Everyday and the American Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DVUP, SCIS
Also offered as: HISP615.
An introduction to the theories of the everyday within the context of the American built environment. Focuses primarily on the American experience of underrepresented, minority, and/or immigrant communities; both historical and contemporary. Attempts to challenge what is meant by American in describing the American everyday built environment.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST131
The History of the American Dream
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST131 or HIST289J.
Formerly: HIST289J.
An introduction to the way Americans thought of themselves in the past, and their often conflicting visions of what constituted the American Dream. Central questions will include whether or not Americans have always envisioned their country as a land of equality, opportunity, democracy, and freedom and whether or not their ideas of what these values meant changed or remained the same over time.
HIST133
"God Wills It!" The Crusades in Medieval and Modern Perspectives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST133, HIST289D, or RELS289D.
Formerly: HIST289D.
An examination of the identities and convictions both of the Western Europeans who participated in the Crusades and of the Easterners (Muslim, Christian, and Jewish) whom they encountered in the Holy Land. Focuses on the era of the first four great Crusades, from about 1095 to 1215. Consideration of the cultural impact of these movements on both Western Europe and the Middle East.
Also offered as RELS289D. Credit granted for HIST133 or RELS289D.
HIST189B
Topics in History; Sustainability and History: The Maryland Experience
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Also offered as ENST140. Credit granted for ENST140 or HIST189B. This course seeks to examine closely the roots of our concern with the concept of sustainability through the environmental history of the state of Maryland.
HIST289N
The Politics of Sexuality in America: A Historical Approach
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
HIST289O
Lawlessness: From Pirates to Body-snatchers, Exploring the Legitimacy of Illicit Activity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Explores motives of and responses to the lawless behavior of pirates, body snatchers, bandits, vigilantes, smugglers and others worldwide from the 1500s to today.
HIST289R
Pocketbook Politics: A History of American Buying and Selling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
This course provides a thematic approach to consumerism as it emerged in the United States over the course of three centuries.
HIST289T
Jesus, Mani, and Muhammad: The Dynamics of New Religious Movements
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Also offered as RELS289M. Credit granted for RELS289M or HIST289T.
HIST289V
What Does It Mean to be An American?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This course seeks to understand the on-going crisis over national identity and purpose by examining the many factors that go into the big stew known as America.
HIST289X
History and the Politics of American Memory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HIST289Y
Zombies, Fear, and Contagion: A Cultural History of Public Health, Medicine, and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HONR
HONR208K
Honors Seminar; Does the Museum Need a Killer App?: An Institution and Its Search for 21st Century Relevance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR208L
Honors Seminar; Justice Matters: Law, Literature, and Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR208T
Honors Seminar; Math Through the Ages
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR209W
Honors Seminar; War Stories: Personal Narratives, Fiction, and Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR218J
Honors Seminar; Sustainability and Development: From the Individual to the Global
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR218P
Honors Seminar; Immigration: Personal Stories and Policy Changes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HONR218W
HONR219E
Honors Seminar; The Psychology of Love and Money
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR219T
Honors Seminar: Surviving Natural Disasters: Learning from Hurricane Katrina, Big Earthquakes, and Other Natural Hazards
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
HONR238G
Honors Seminar; The Manhattan Project: A Century of Radioactivity, Nuclear Weapons, and Nuclear Power
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR239A
Honors Seminar; Constructing and De-Constructing the Colonial Chesapeake
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
HONR239F
Honors Seminar: Plants and Empires: Historical Consequences and Contemporary Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR239W
Honors Seminar; The Syrian Civil War in Comparative Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR248G
Honors Seminar; The Origins and Ramifications of Sex and Sexes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, DVUP, SCIS
HONR248J
Honors Seminar; A Most Human Nation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Credit will only be granted for HONR248J or HHUM205.
HONR259G
Honors Seminar; Fairness, Inequality, and Democracy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR268Z
Honors Seminar; Catastrophic Animal and Human Disease Outbreaks: What Else Can We Do To Prevent Them?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit may only be granted for HONR268Z or ANSC277.
HONR269E
Honors Seminar; Exploring Key Issues of Globalization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR269G
Honors Seminar; Hungry, Hot and Crowded: Global Challenges in the 21st Century
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit granted only for HONR269G or HONR229A.
HONR269L
(Perm Req)
Honors Seminar; Cracking the Secrets of the Universe Using Computers: Re-discovering the Higgs & Searching for Invisible Matter-Part II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
The second part of a two-semester Honors research seminar. Part one of this series was offered in the Fall 2016 semester. For permission to enroll, please contact Dr. Shabnam Jabeen at Jabeen@umd.edu.
HONR269T
Honors Seminar: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy toward Afghanistan
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR278D
Honors Seminar; Natural SEcurity Dilemmas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR278E
Honors Seminar; The Internet, Democracy, and Dictatorship
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Also offered as JOUR458E. Credit granted for JOUR458E or HONR278E.

The internet has revolutionized the delivery of information and the networking of citizens worldwide, but has it delivered democracy to new places? This course dissects and analyzes the role of the internet in regime resilience and change in a global perspective. This course demonstrates how the huge range of data and analytical tools available via the online sphere can lead to new understanding of both human and regime behavior.
HONR279I
Honors Seminar; The Power of the Word: Freedom of Speech in the U.S. and Russia
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit granted for HONR279I or RUSS289I.
HONR289L
Honors Seminar; Biofuels: Fact or Fiction?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR289P
Honors Seminar; How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit will be granted for only one of the following: BMGT289B or HONR289P. Evening guest speakers 6:30pm-9:15pm are on three specific dates. Daytime meetings will be held every week.
HONR289V
Honors Seminar; Mars Exploration: Past, Present, Future
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR289Z
Honors Seminar; Social Expectations of Gender Roles in Africa, the Middle East, and South West Asia
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR348D
Advanced Honors Seminar; Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Permission required. Also offered as BSOS388B and PUAF388D. Credit will granted for BSOS388B, HONR348D or PUAF388D.
HONR348M
Advanced Honors Seminar; Stock Market
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
HONR349I
Honors Colloquium; Leading and Investing in Social Change: Redifining and Experimenting with Philanthropy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR289E
Media Law and Ethics in the Digital Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This course is intended for non-journalism majors. Explore the First Amendment, libel, privacy, FOIA and copyright as they evolved in the digital news age of bloggers, tweeters, and citizen journalists. This course will cover fundamental legal and ethical concepts as well as practical application.
JOUR289F
Beyond Facebook: How Social Media are Transforming Society, Culture, Business and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examining the rise of social media and their impact on culture, business, government, politics, journalism and society, this course provides students with a broad contextual understanding of the multidisciplinary impacts of social media such as Twitter, Facebook and similar Internet-based services.
JOUR289P
Scandal! Exposing Corruption, Injustice, and Vice in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Students will examine the nature and meaning of scandals in society: how they are uncovered and constructed; why some forms of wrongdoing are are considered scandalous but not others; how this definition has changed over time; and how scandals resonate in ways that reflect societal norms.
JOUR458E
Special Topics in Journalism; The Internet, Democracy, and Dictatorship
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Also offered as HONR278E. Credit granted for JOUR458E or HONR278E.

The internet has revolutionized the delivery of information and the networking of citizens worldwide, but has it delivered democracy to new places? This course dissects and analyzes the role of the internet in regime resilience and change in a global perspective. This course demonstrates how the huge range of data and analytical tools available via the online sphere can lead to new understanding of both human and regime behavior.
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES222
Gambling in the New Millennium: Poker, The Preakness, Point-spreads, Powerball and Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Recommended: ENGL101 and COMM107.
Is gambling in the public interest? Students will critically examine the various implications of "what it means to gamble" through investigations of various gambling forms, different sectors of the gambling industry and the related economics, along with consumer behavior, sport, public policy and public health in this context.
KNES289W
Topical Investigations; The Cybernetic Human
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Can the profound and rapid technological advances experienced in the 21st century change what it means to be human or the nature of humanity? Emergent technologies, new materials, increased computer power, engineering innovations, and groundbreaking work in the sciences of cognition and action provide myriad opportunities for repairing and enhancing the human body and brain. Examines the ethical, social, and technological implications of an increasing synergism of technology and and the body in sports and the arts, at work or home, rehabilitating the the body and the brain, and society at large.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING262
HERITAGE LANGUAGES AND THEIR SPEAKERS
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Additional information: One class per week will be in-field instruction in collecting data from heritage speakers.
An interdisciplinary examination of the phenomenon of heritage language (a bilingual's home language which is distinct from the dominant language of the wider society). Relationship between linguistic structure, cultural and social aspects of language use, and language change. Interpretations of experimental and theoretical work. Relevance of heritage languages for linguistic theory, language policy, and education.
MUSC
School of Music Department Site
MUSC289I
Exploring the Power of Musical Performance in Social Engagement
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
NFSC
Nutrition and Food Science Department Site
NFSC220
Diet: Is it a cause or a solution
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
If diet is a very straightforward topic; then why and how does this simple matter result in complicated health problems? Diet can provide a simple solution to numerous health issues. So, why do many people fail to follow this seemingly simple solution and still suffer from obesity and other diet-related diseases? Diet is a topic that most people know but few people understand. In addition, diet has become one of the most important lenses for looking at a variety of social, economic, and cultural issues. Since the concept of diet is continuum and has multifaceted aspects, we need to understand it in broad and multidisciplinary perspectives including social, cultural and economic aspects.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL209J
Philosophical Issues: The Rights and Wrongs of Killing People
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
PHIL209N
Know Thyself: Wisdom Through Cognitive Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
How do we improve our decision making? Reflection on the practical implications of some recent findings in cognitive science.
PSYC
Psychology Department Site
PSYC289D
Living the Good Life: The Psychology of Happiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
What are the secrets to living a happy life? This course will introduce students to contemporary scientific approaches to studying age-old questions about how to get happy.
PUAF
Public Policy
PUAF101
Great Thinkers on Public Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Additional information: Emphasis will be on the interdisciplinary foundations of public policy, through examining core disciplinary contributions from economics, political science, management, philosophy, and other relevant disciplines.
Great ideas in public policy, such as equality, efficiency, sovereignty, liberty, bureaucracy, democracy and security are explored through the lens of great thinkers. An introduction to the intellectual foundations of public policy, from ancient theories on collective public action through the more contemporary development of public policy as a discipline. This may start as early as the ancient Greek philosophers and their views on public action through contemporary classics of public policy. At the conclusion of the course, students will have read classic works in the field and will master the key themes that have dominated the intellectual debates about public policy over its history.
PUAF201
Leadership for the Common Good
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
This course is designed to provide undergraduate students an introduction to leadership theory and a chance to practice a core set of practical skills relevant to transformational and collaborative leadership.
PUAF388D
Special Topics in Public Policy; Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS

A Fearless Ideas Course from the Academy for Innovation & Entrepreneurship (AIE): http://ter.ps/iamFEARLESS Click here for more information on the Fearless Ideas Courses.
PUAF388G
Special Topics in Public Policy; Global Perspectives on Leading and Investing in Social Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Poverty, climate change, gender equity, human trafficking, refugee and humanitarian emergencies, public health crises... how do we tackle the world's most pressing issues? Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are working across borders and in the most desperate circumstances to alleviate suffering and solve problems. This course will discuss the role of NGOs both here and abroad while analyzing the trends and issues related to giving and fundraising for international issues.
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS289D
God Wills It! The Crusades in Medieval and Modern Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Also offered as HIST133. Credit granted for HIST133 or RELS289D.
RELS289I
What is Religion?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVCC, SCIS
Draws upon examples from a wide variety of religious traditions to explore the question of what religion is and how to best understand it. Engagement with diverse approaches to religion including phenomenology and the study of "the sacred"; sociology and the study of religious communities; and questions of religious experience, ritual, and identity formation.
RELS289M
Jesus, Mani, and Muhammad: The Dynamics of New Religious Movements
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Also offered as HIST289T. Credit granted for RELS289M or HIST289T.
SOCY
Sociology Department Site
SOCY200
Human Societies
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
A comparative, historical, interdisciplinary study of human socieities that focuses on the main components of human societies, how they are organized, how they change, and how they come to shape our collective social existence.
SPHL
Public Health Department Site
SPHL498G
Special Topics in Public Health; Public Health in the City: Global and Domestic Perspectives on the Urban Environment
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
THET
Theatre Department Site
THET287
Subversive Cultures and Performance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: THET289I or THET287.
Formerly: THET289I.
Every society has rebels - those who refuse to conform to the mainstream's rigid rules, aesthetics, and beliefs. From unruly skateboarders, punk rockers, bohemian poets, and radical theater performers, to national revolutionary movements and brick-throwing anarchists - such groups form niches that are defined by their exclusion from society. We will look at how their beliefs and actions fit into a particular historical context, and how their actions drive social change.