Hide Advanced Options
Courses - Fall 2017
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP200
African Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A survey of African civilizations from 4500 B.C. to present. Analysis of traditional social systems. Discussion of the impact of European colonization on these civilizations. Analysis of the influence of traditional African social systems on modern African institutions as well as discussion of contemporary processes of Africanization.
AASP298L
Special Topics in Afro-American Studies: African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as ENGL234. Credit granted for AASP298L or ENGL234.
AAST
Asian American Studies Department Site
AAST398B
Selected Topics in Asian American Studies; Asian American Social Policy and Community Advocacy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as PLCY359A. Credit granted for AAST398B or PLCY359A.

This course focuses on how Asian and Pacific Americans are represented in government and throughout social policies in the United States. The ways in which racial and gender dynamics intersect with migration policy, community development, and other pressing issues is explored.
AAST398L
Selected Topics in Asian American Studies; Asian American Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST101
Introduction American Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: AMST101 or AMST201.
Formerly: AMST201.
Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies by examining concepts such as culture, identity, cultural practices, and globalization, as well as theories underlying these concepts. Engages key themes, especially constructions of difference and identity, cultures of everyday life, and America and the world.
AMST203
Popular Culture in America
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
An introduction to American popular culture, its historical development, and its role as a reflection of and influence on our culture and society.
AMST204
Film and American Culture Studies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Exploration of the American film from a historical perspective, illustrating the motion picture's role as an institutional phenomenon, as a form of communication, and as a source of cross-cultural study.
AMST205
Material Aspects of American Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Historical survey of American material culture. Ways of describing and interpreting accumulated material evidence (e.g., buildings, town plans) introduced by stressing relationship between artifact and culture.
AMST298Q
Selected Topics in American Studies; U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as ENGL235. Credit granted for ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
ARAB
ARAB253
The Arabian Nights and the Art of Storytelling
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: ARAB 298B or ARAB253.
Formerly: ARAB298B.
One Thousand and One Nights (Arabic Kitab alf laylah wa laylah; English The Arabian Nights) is a collection of stories and folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age, and explores how this text has shaped Western perceptions of the Arabic-Islamic world as well as its impact on the literary production of similar works in Europe and the Middle East. Taught in English.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH170
Design Thinking and Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Examines conceptual, perceptual, behavioral, and technical aspects of the built environment, and methods of analysis, problem-solving, and design implementation.
ARHU
Arts and Humanities Department Site
ARHU275
Writing to be Seen: Scriptwriting for Theatre, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Also offered as: ENGL275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL278D, ENGL275, ARHU319B or ARHU275.
Formerly: ENGL278D; ARHU319B.
Introduction to theory and practice of scriptwriting with opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed for spectators. Practice writing for the stage, film and television, with emphasis on critical reading of textual and visual literary models. Theory and scholarship teaching opportunities and advantages of each format. Application of scholarship to analysis and critique of plays and texts successful across two different formats. Examination of selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for students' own creative work. Frequent writing exercises and use of workshop format.
ARHU298L
Critical Approaches to Traditional and Non-Traditional Literary Forms across Different Cultures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Examines the different types of literature (Novel, Short Story, Flash Fiction, Comics, etc. ) produced by groups or individuals under diverse circumstances (cultural, historical, political, geographical, economic, philosophical, etc.). The required texts will provide the students with an opportunity to revaluate some commonly underestimated literary forms, such as flash fiction, comics orspoken word poetry and to understand the function of these manifestations in relationship to more traditional (canonical) expressions such as the novel.
ARHU319
(Perm Req)
Writers' House Second Year Colloquium: Form and Theory of Creative Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
For Writers' House students only. For further details please contact Johnna Schmidt jmschmid@umd.edu.Course will meet in Queen Anne's Library
ARTH
Art History & Archaeology Department Site
ARTH200
Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines the material culture and visual expressions of Mediterranean and European societies from early times until ca. 1300 CE, emphasizing the political, social, and religious context of the works studied, the relationships of the works to the societies that created them, and the interrelationship of these societies.
ARTH201
Art and Society in the West from the Renaissance to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Examines representative European and American works of art from the later Middle Ages to the present, highlighting the dynamic exchange between artistic and cultural traditions both within periods and across time.
ARTH292
Discovering Japan: How the Arts Shaped a Nation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores the origins and creation of Japan from ancient to contemporary times through East Asian and European exchange. Acquaints students with painting, sculpture, architecture, ceramics, gardens, and other art forms in relation to the various cultural contexts within which they were produced and used.
ARTT
Art Studio Department Site
ARTT150
Introduction to Art Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Fundamental concepts of global, philosophic, and critical art theory examined through various historic and contemporary texts, and the analysis of works of art.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS170
Greek and Roman Mythology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: RELS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
An introduction to the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome. This cours is particularly recommended for students planning to major in foreign languages, English, history, the fine arts, or journalism. Taught in English.
CLAS275
Why do we laugh?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
An introduction to the breadth and complexity of humor's role in society. Students will familiarize themselves with the explanations that various disciplines have offered about what makes us laugh, and analyze the major impact humor has in our understanding of who we are and how we see our world.
CLAS311
Inventing Ancient Greek Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Who were the ancient Greeks, and were they the founders of Western civilization? The course examines the foundations of ancient Greece. Through an analysis of the historical, archaeological, and linguistic evidence, it sheds light on the so-called Black Athena Controversy, which raised doubts about the ancient Greek contribution to Western culture. The course also focuses on the impact of modern identity politics on scholarly discussions of antiquity and the ways in which the Culture Wars of the 1980s and 1990s have influenced analyses of the ancient Greek world.
CMLT
Comparative Literature Department Site
CMLT235
Black Diaspora Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: CMLT235 or ENGL235.
Examination of key works by writers of the African Diaspora. Relationship among black people across multiple geographic spaces; Africa, the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Specific historical, cultural, and literary contexts; themes such as gender, sexuality, migration, slavery, freedom, and equality. Readings may include literary texts (fiction, poetry, drama), music and film. All readings in English, but drawn from multiple languages of the black diaspora, including English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.
CMLT242
Introduction to Jewish Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as: JWST272.
Credit only granted for: HEBR231, JWST272, or CMLT242.
Formerly: HEBR231.
A survey of Jewish literature and introduction to methods of reading literature in general and Jewish literature in particular. Concern with what makes a literary corpus Jewish and other issues of canonicity. All texts in English translation.
CMLT270
Global Literature and Social Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of literature through selected literary works from several non-Western cultures, viewed cross-culturally in light of particular social, political, and economic perspectives.
CMLT275
World Literature by Women
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as: WMST275.
Credit only granted for: CMLT275 or WMST275.
Comparative study of selected works by women writers of several countries, exploring points of intersection and divergence in women's literary representations.
CMLT277
Literatures of the Americas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of several North, South, and Central American culture with a focus on the specificities, similarities, and divergences of their literary and cultural texts.
Also offered as ENGL278L.
CMLT280
Film Art in a Global Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Comparative study of a variety of film traditions from around the world including cinema from Hollywood, Europe, Asia and developing countries, with a stress on different cultural contexts for film-making and viewing.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM324
Communication and Gender
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
The creation of images of male and female, and masculine and feminine, through communication, the differences in male and female communication behaviors and styles, and the implications of those images and styles for male-female transactions.
EDCI
Curriculum and Instruction Department Site
EDCI466
Literature for Adolescents
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75; and permission of EDUC-Teaching, Learning, Policy and Leadership department.
Reading and analysis of fiction and nonfiction; methods for critically assessing quality and appeal; current theory and methods of instruction; research on response to literature; curriculum design and selection of books.
EDPS
Education Policy Studies
EDPS210
Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: EDPL210 or EDPS210.
Formerly: EDPL210.
An examination of illustrative historical and philosophical examples of the interplay of ideas and events in the shaping of educational aims and practices from ancient cultures to modern technological societies.
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL130
Race and the Cultural Politics of Blood: A Historical Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL130 or ENGL237.
Formerly: ENGL237.
Exploration of race, as term and concept, at three different historical times and from three different perspectives, through the reading of three stories: William Shakespeare's drama Othello, Aphra Behn's novella Oroonoko, and the short story Benito Cereno by Herman Melville. Exploration of the importance of context in interpretation. Study of how a concept for rationalizing human difference appears and adapts, fuses and fades away, relocates and is repurposed. How understanding of the particular situation of the concept, its context, changes our reading of the story.
ENGL140
American Fictions: Cross-Examining U.S. Literature, History, and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL140 or ENGL289Y.
Formerly: ENGL289Y.
Major works of American literature explored in relation to major texts and developments of U.S. history, culture and politics. Special attention to global contexts and complications of "American" literature and history. Key historical and political issues include human rights, democratic principles, independence, revolution, slavery, removal, immigration, free speech, labor rights, civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, economic globalization, technology and digital innovation, and the role literature and the humanities may play in fostering various forms of responsible citizenship.
ENGL150
Uncanny Technologies: Monsters, Droids, and Vampires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL150 or ENGL289T.
Formerly: ENGL289T.
Explores dark, uncertain borders between human and nonhuman, natural and unnatural, life and death. What literature teaches about new technologies that seek to represent or replicate human experience. Examination of a series of nineteenth-century American, French, German, and British novels and stories from Frankenstein (1818) to Dracula (1897) featuring recently introduced media and inventions such as photographs, phonographs, automata, and motion pictures that are concerned, like works of literature, with recording and reproducing human consciousness and human body.
ENGL201
Inventing Western Literature: Ancient and Medieval Traditions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Wide range of texts, genres, and themes from ancient and medieval Western traditions. Study of cultural, historical, and artistic forces shaping traditions, and the influence and relevance of those traditions to life in twenty-first century.
ENGL206
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: ENGL205, ENGL206, or ENGL289I.
Formerly: ENGL205.
Shakespeare's poems, history plays, comedies, and tragedies as investigations into language use, governance, sexuality, ethics, and mortality.
ENGL221
American Literature: Beginning to 1865
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Surveys American writing from the founding of the colonies through the Civil War. Authors such as Taylor, Cooper, Poe, Dickinson.
ENGL222
American Literature: 1865 to Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Surveys American writing from the Civil War through the Cold War. Authors such as Clemens, Frost, Hurston, Bellow.
ENGL234
African-American Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
An exploration of the stories black authors tell about themselves, their communities, and the nation as informed by time and place, gender, sexuality, and class. African American perspective themes such as art, childhood, sexuality, marriage, alienation and mortality, as well as representations of slavery, Reconstruction, racial violence and the Nadir, legalized racism and segregation, black patriotism and black ex-patriots, the optimism of integration, and the prospects of a post-racial America.
Also offered as AASP298L. Credit will be granted for one of the following: AASP298L or ENGL234.
ENGL235
U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Poetry, prose, and theater of Latina/o communities in the United States from origins in Spanish colonization of North America to ongoing development in the 21st century. How authors use literary form to gain insight into human experience, including mortality, religious belief, gender and sexuality, war and peace, family, language use, scientific inquiry, cultural tradition, ecology, and labor. How Latina/o literary traditions have shaped and been shaped by broader currents in American literature. Connections between Latina/o literature and social and artistic developments in other parts of the world, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. Authors may include Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Eulalia Perez, Juan Nepomuceno Seguin, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Jose Marti, Arthur A. Schomburg, Jesus Colon, Julia de Burgos, Cesar Chavez, Ariel Dorfman, Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, and Cristina Garcia.
Additional Note: Also offered as AMST298Q. Credit granted for ENGL235 or AMST298Q.
ENGL243
What is Poetry?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An exploration of arguably the most complex, profound, and ubiquitous expression of human experience. Study through close reading of significant forms and conventions of Western poetic tradition. Poetry's roots in oral and folk traditions and connections to popular song forms.
ENGL245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not have completed FILM245.
Also offered as: FILM245.
Credit only granted for: CMLT214, CMLT245, ENGL245, or FILM245.
Formerly: CMLT214.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
ENGL250
Reading Women Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as: WMST255.
Credit only granted for: ENGL250 or WMST255.
Explores literary and cultural expressions by women and their receptions within a range of historical periods and genres. Topics such as what does a woman need in order to write, what role does gender play in the production, consumption, and interpretation of texts, and to what extent do women comprise a distinct literary subculture. Interpretation of texts will be guided by feminist and gender theory, ways of reading that have emerged as important to literary studies over the last four decades.
ENGL255
Literature of Science and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: ENGL255 or ENGL278T.
Formerly: ENGL278T.
Examines science and technology through the lens of British and America literature, primarily between 1800 and the present. Readings from early natural and experimental philosophers of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. How literary works represent the ethics of science and technology; beneficial developments of science, and also heavy toll of industrialization. Writers studied may include Francis Bacon, Mary Shelley, Charles Darwin, H.G. Wells, Albert Einstein, Aldous Huxley, Richard Feynman, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, Michael Frayn, and Tom Stoppard.
ENGL256
Fantasy Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
How fantasy employs alternate forms of representation, such as the fantastical, estranging, or impossible, which other genres would not allow. Through novels, short stories, graphic novels, and film, traces fantasy's roots in mythology and folklore, then explores how modern texts build upon or challenge these origins. Examination of literary strategies texts use to represent the world through speculative modes. How to distinguish fantasy from, and relate it to, other genres such as science fiction, horror, fairly tales, and magical realism. Fantasy's investment in world-building, history, tradition, and categories of identity such as race, class, and gender. How fantasy, as a genre, form, and world-view, is well-suited to our contemporary reality.
ENGL257
Children's Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Literature of the nineteenth through the twenty-first century concerned with, and written for, children and young adults. How such narratives speak to themes of changing social, religious, political, and personal identity. Through poetry, novels, graphic novels, and film, explores how children's tales encapsulate and reflect on human existence, while pushing boundaries of what constitutes "children's literature" and what exactly defines the "child." Considers questions of literary classification through investigation of political and religious issues, gender politics, animal rights, social justice, race, war, and what it means to "grow up."
ENGL262
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: JWST262.
Credit only granted for: JWST262, HEBR223, or ENGL262.
Formerly: HEBR223.
An exploration of the origins and compositional history of biblical literature. Critical study of texts and socio-historical analysis of their background.
ENGL265
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed LGBT265.
Also offered as: LGBT265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
Exploration of literary and cultural expressions of sexuality and gender. Study of a range of historical periods and literary genres, such as essay, poetry, novel, drama, film. Topics include sexual norms and dissidence, gender identity and expression, the relationship between aesthetic forms and sexual subjectivity. Interpretation of texts particularly through the lens of queer theory. Examination of how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference, including race and class.
ENGL275
Writing to be Seen: Scriptwriting for Theatre, Film, and Television
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Also offered as: ARHU275.
Credit only granted for: ENGL278D, ENGL275, ARHU319B, or ARHU275.
Formerly: ENGL278D; ARHU319B.
Introduction to the theory and practice of scriptwriting with an opportunity to read, view, evaluate, write, and revise texts meant to be performed. Students will practice writing for the stage, film, and television and also examine selected scripts, performances, and film and television clips as models for their own creative work. Students will complete frequent writing exercises, participate in workshops, and learn to apply scholarship to the analysis and critique of scripts.
Also offered as ARHU275.
ENGL280
The English Language
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Introduction to the structure of English and its historical development with a focus on techniques of linguistic analysis. Major topics include the sound systems of English and its patterns of word formation and sentence structure, and the ways these have changed over time and vary around the world.
ENGL282
How Rhetoric Works: Persuasive Power and Strategies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Examines how persuasion functions and influences our lives and perception, focusing on a variety of contexts: business, politics, media, law, and entertainment. Students learn persuasive and argumentative principles to understand what rhetoric is, how it works, and what it does, and to apply the knowledge to produce effective communication appropriate for their purpose, audience, and context. A wide range of persuasive media, genres, and forms will be studied to help students sharpen how they interpret and practice persuasion.
ENGL293
Writing in the Wireless World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Recommended: ENGL101.
Credit only granted for: ENGL278Z or ENGL293.
Formerly: ENGL278Z.
A hands-on exploration of writing at the intersection of technology and rhetoric. Students will learn to read, analyze, and compose the kind of multimodal documents (combining text, image, and sound) that constitute communication in our digital world.
ENGL294
Persuasion and Cleverness in Social Media
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
Prerequisite: Must have satisfied Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement.
Exploration of various persuasive media encountered in daily life through the lens of rhetorical and critical theories. Principles of rhetoric and analysis of how persuasion functions across media. Invention of effective multimedia works appropriate to purpose, audience, and context. Concepts from cultural studies used to develop critical awareness about power and ideology and how they influence the way people produce and understand messages. By integration of technology, rhetoric, and cultural studies, students become more critically-rhetorically informed thinkers, authors, and audiences of arguments and culture in the digital age. Writing intensive course. No prior multimedia experience is expected.
ENGL296
Reading and Writing Disability
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Rhetoric-based course that locates and analyzes disability in various settings, modes, and texts. Investigates material and cultural effects of the language, stories, and myths of disability. Exploration of the many definitions and frameworks of disability. Disability as dynamic lived experiences, as a political identities, as a rich culture, as socially constructed barriers, and as an oppressed minority group. Social, medical, political, cultural, and personal definitions of disability; how disability is portrayed, controlled, stereotyped, and celebrated.
ENGL304
The Major Works of Shakespeare
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not have completed ENGL403 or ENGL404.
Representative early, middle, and later works, including comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances. Historical and cultural contexts.
ENGL327
The Suburbs in American Literature and Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Explores through written expression and through cinema the diverse and changing world of US suburbia. Premised on two arguments: (1) the suburbs embody many of the contours and contradictions of American life; and (2) the suburbs are far more racially, ethnically, culturally, sexually, economically diverse than mass media suggests. Investigation via prose, poetry, drama, and cinema, as well as secondary sources in sociology, women's studies, ethnic studies, history, cultural studies, psychology, anthropology, and the history of science and technology.
ENGL362
Caribbean Literature in English
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as ENGL362. Credit granted for ENGL362 or LASC348E.

Political and literary traditions that intersect in the fiction, poetry, and drama written in English by Caribbean writers, primarily during the 20th century.
Also offered as LASC348E. Credit granted for ENGL362 or LASC348E.
FILM
Film Studies Department Site
FILM245
Film Form and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not have completed ENGL245.
Also offered as: ENGL245.
Credit only granted for: CMLT214, CMLT245, ENGL245, or FILM245.
Formerly: CMLT214.
Introduction to film as art form and how films create meaning. Basic film terminology; fundamental principles of film form, film narrative, and film history. Examination of film technique and style over past one hundred years. Social and economic functions of film within broader institutional, economic, and cultural contexts.
FREN
FREN250
Introduction to Cultural and Textual Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: FREN204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a native/fluent speaker of French.
Credit only granted for: FREN250 or FREN250H.
Introduction to cultural and textual analysis of selected readings from various genres in French literature. Taught in French.
Also offered as FREN 250H.
FREN250H
Introduction to Cultural and Textual Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: FREN204; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Restriction: Must not be a native/fluent speaker of French.
Credit only granted for: FREN250 or FREN250H.
Introduction to cultural and textual analysis of selected readings from various genres in French literature. Taught in French.
For general honors students only. Also offered as FREN 250.
FREN480
French Cinema: A Cultural Approach (in Translation)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: FILM420.
Credit only granted for: FREN480 or FILM420.
A study of French culture, civilization, and literature through the medium of film. Taught in English.
GERM
Germanic Studies Department Site
GERM255
Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: GERM255 or GERM289G.
Formerly: GERM289G.
Additional information: Course is taught in English.
A critical examination of how fairy tales and folklore pervade and influence diverse facets of Western culture, ranging from issues of politics and national identity, ethics and morality, violence and fear, education and pedagogy, to gender and sexuality in the establishment and regulation of social norms. Taking the German tales collected by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm as its focal point, the magical and often terrifying world of fairy tales within the German, European, and American cultural traditions from Romanticism to today will be explored.
GERM322
Highlights of German Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: GERM302; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Selected literary masterworks, social and cultural issues, and historical events in German-speaking countries from the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Junges Deutschland, Realism, Naturalism and its counter currents, Expressionism to the present. Taught in German.
Taught in German. Also offered as GERM322H.
GERM322H
Highlights of German Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: GERM302; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Selected literary masterworks, social and cultural issues, and historical events in German-speaking countries from the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Junges Deutschland, Realism, Naturalism and its counter currents, Expressionism to the present. Taught in German.
Taught in German. Also offered as GERM322.
HEBR
HEBR249W
Special Topics in Hebrew Studies; Hebrew on the Web
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
HEBR313
Conversation and Composition I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: HEBR212; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
A practical language course recommended for all students continuing with Hebrew. Review of grammar and composition. Selected readings. Oral and written exercises.
HHUM
Honors Humanities Department Site
HHUM105
Honors Humanities: Introduction to the Arts and Humanities
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must be an entering freshmen in the Honors Humanities Program.
Credit only granted for: ARHU105 or HHUM105.
Formerly: ARHU105.
Introduction to the university, the different fields of the arts and humanities, and the history of how the university and the humanities have evolved across the world from ancient times to the present. Primary emphasis on reading and discussion of literary artifacts to assess the meaning and social status of the arts and humanities in the past and their personal and social value for the future.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST110
The Ancient World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Interpretation of select literature and art of the ancient Mediterranean world with a view to illuminating the antecedents of modern culture; religion and myth in the ancient Near East; Greek philosophical, scientific, and literary invention; and the Roman tradition in politics and administration.
HIST120
Islamic Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: RELS120.
Credit only granted for: HIST120 or RELS120.
Introduction to society and culture in the Middle East since the advent of Islam: as a personal and communal faith; as artistic and literary highlights of intellectual and cultural life; and as the interplay between politics and religion under the major Islamic regimes.
HIST134
Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, and Witches: Famous Trials in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examination of some of the most famous trials in American history and their enduring hold on the imagination.
HIST134S
Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, and Witches: Famous Trials in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examination of some of the most famous trials in American history and their enduring hold on the imagination.
Restricted to students in College Park Scholars-Justice and Legal Thought program.
HIST200
Interpreting American History: Beginnings to 1877
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
Credit only granted for: HIST156 or HIST200.
Formerly: HIST156.
The United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. Establishment and development of American institutions.
HIST201
Interpreting American History: From 1865 to the Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: HIST157 or HIST201.
Formerly: HIST157.
The United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. Rise of industry and emergence of the United States as a world power.
HIST205
Environmental History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU
An exploration of the way different societies have used, imagined, and managed nature. Includes examination of questions of land use, pollution, conservation, and the ideology of nature, especially but not exclusively in Europe and North America.
HIST287
Why the Jews? Historical and Cultural Investigations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed HIST282, HIST283, JWST234, or JWST235.
Also offered as: JWST233.
Credit only granted for: HIST287 or JWST233.
Examines the history and culture of the Jews from the thirteenth century BCE/BC to the present through an examination of significant themes or problems (such as "religion" or "diaspora") that shape our understanding of the Jewish people. A primary focus in the course will be on texts, artifacts, and other cultural products by Jews and others that illustrate the history of the Jews help understand their cultural heritage.
HIST289Y
Zombies, Fear, and Contagion: A Cultural History of Public Health, Medicine, and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HIST319K
Special Topics in History; Antisemitism: The "Old", the "Modern", and the "New" in European History and Beyond
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
This course first examines pre-modern "old" religiously based antagonism to Judaism and the Jews, then turns to "modern" more secular forms of antisemitism in 19th and 20th centuries and concludes with "new" examination of globalization of antisemitism in late 20th and early 21st century.
HONR
HONR208L
Honors Seminar; Justice Matters: Law, Literature, and Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR208M
Honors Seminar: Utopia and Dystopia: Reality and Relevance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR208R
Leonardo and the Science of Art
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR217
Life, The Multiverse and Everything: Developing an Individual Cosmovision
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
In this Honors seminar, students pursue personal cosmologies in light o our contemporary core "Western" scientific world-view and a selection of other ancient and indigenous cosmographies for comparison including those of Mesoamerica, the Inca, the Egyptians or the Chinese.
HONR218B
Honors Seminar; Making a Difference: The Lives and Words of Leaders Who Shape Our Time
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR218C
Honors Seminar; Love Me, Hate Me, Use Me, Save Me: Our Conflicting Views of
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
HONR218L
Honors Seminar: Language and Mind
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
HONR218P
Honors Seminar; Immigration: Personal Stories and Policy Changes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HONR218T
Honors Seminar; Political Theater: On Stage and in Washington
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
HONR238P
Honors Seminar; Memory, Imagination, Invention: A Creative Writing Workshop
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
HONR239B
Honors Seminar: New York City and the American Dream
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
HONR248J
Honors Seminar; A Most Human Nation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HONR249E
Honors Seminar: Modern and Postmodern Music: Trends, Styles, Issues, and Ideas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
HONR258T
Honors Seminar: Tools of Fiction: Literature and/as Creative Writing
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
HONR279L
Honors Seminar; The Problem of Prejudice: Overcoming Impediments to Global Peace and Justice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR279Q
Honors Seminar; The Boy Who Lived, All Grown Up: Assessing the Harry Potter Books and their Adaptations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
HONR279R
Honors Seminar; Faith and Values in Public Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
HONR299C
Honors Seminar; Fashion and Costumes Through the Ages
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
ISRL
Israel Studies
ISRL349Z
Investigating Topics in Israel Studies; Beyond Black and White: Jews and Representations of Race
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as JWST319M. Credit granted for ISRL349Z or JWST319M.

An examination of Western constructions and representations of 'race' from medieval times to the modern rise of Zionism and the founding of Israel, with a focus on how Jews utilized the racial discourses of each period to negotiate their position within Western history.
JAPN
Japanese Department Site
JAPN221
Radical Transformations in Japanese Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Since the early modern period, Japanese cultural forms have reflected the innate instability of contemporary social structures. Focusing on Noh drama, Matsuo Basho's haiku travelogue Oku no hosomichi, popular fiction by Ihara Saikaku, the movement for vernacular literature in the late 19th century, the rise and fall of Marxists and feminists in early 20th century Japan, a variety of perspectives on WWII and its legacy, as well as Japanese pop culture, we will consider the way cultural works developed as part of Japan's radical transformations in the last four centuries. A major film component increases students' direct exposure to the work of Japan's cultural producers, and students' suggestions and interests will help shape the final unit of the course about Japan today. Taught in English, and all readings are in English translation.
JAPN498G
Special Topics in Japanese Studies; From Gentlewomen to Samurai: Japanese Literature in Translation 700-1600 CE
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU
Students will read major and minor works of Japanese literature from the earliest legends and poetry, through the women's writing of the Heian period, to the Buddhist and warrior literature of the Kamakura and Muromachi eras. We will examine the intersection of poetry and prose, men and women's writing, and religious expression. Most of our class time will be spent in group discussion of the literary works. This course is intended for everyone -- no Japanese knowledge is required.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR289J
Probing War: Investigative Narratives and American Conflicts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
In this course, we will explore the realities of war through the work of journalists who pushed beyond the daily headlines, some risking life and limb, to challenge official versions and document uncomfortable realities about American conflicts.
JOUR456
Literature in Journalism
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: JOUR673.
Credit only granted for: JOUR456 or JOUR673.
From Truman Capote's In Cold Blood to Mark Bowden's Black Hawk Down, students will examine how literary works can help writers approach a subject in a different way than more traditional forms of journalism, including the advantages and limitations of the style.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST233
Why the Jews? Historical and Cultural Investigations
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed HIST282, HIST283, JWST234, or JWST235.
Also offered as: HIST287.
Credit only granted for: JWST233 or HIST287.
Examines the history and culture of the Jews from the thirteenth century BCE/BC to the present through an examination of significant themes or problems (such as "religion" or "diaspora") that shape our understanding of the Jewish people. A primary focus in the course will be on texts, artifacts, and other cultural products by Jews and others that illustrate the history of the Jews help understand their cultural heritage.
JWST262
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: ENGL262.
Credit only granted for: JWST262, HEBR223 or ENGL262.
Formerly: HEBR223.
Origins of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), with attention to literary formations, archaeology, and social-political settings. Explorations of major questions, including who wrote the Bible, and when; relationships of the biblical tradition to the mythology and religious structures of ancient Israel's near eastern neighbors; and dynamics of politics, religious leadership, and law.
JWST272
Introduction to Jewish Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as: CMLT242.
Credit only granted for: CMLT242 or JWST272.
A survey of Jewish literature and introduction to methods of reading literature in general and Jewish literature in particular. Concern with what makes a literary corpus Jewish and other issues of canonicity. All texts in English translation.
JWST289J
Jerusalem in Antiquity: The History of Sacred Space in a Holy City
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Also offered as RELS289J. Credit will be granted for JWST289J or RELS289J.

The questions of sacred space through the topic of Jerusalem are explored. The study of Jerusalem's history as a holy city reveals the many ways by which sacred space is constructed. It will also examine the development of places that continue to hold great sanctity in Judaism (the Western Wall), Christianity (the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Mount of Olives), and Islam (the Dome of the Rock and the Al-Aqsa Mosque on the Haram ash-Sharif).
JWST319M
Special Topics in Jewish Studies; Beyond Black and White: Jews and Representations of Race
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as ISRL349Z. Credit granted for ISRL349Z or JWST319M.

An examination of Western constructions and representations of 'race' from medieval times to the modern rise of Zionism and the founding of Israel, with a focus on how Jews utilized the racial discourses of each period to negotiate their position within Western history.
JWST346
Representing the Holocaust
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: ENGL332.
Credit only granted for: ENGL379J, JWST419I, ENGL332, or JWST346.
Formerly: ENGL379J and JWST419I.
Different perspectives on how the Holocaust should be represented. Examination of a wide range of texts including fiction, memoirs, critical essays, poems and films in different languages (in translation). Emphasis on the international and comparative nature of Holocaust literary studies and investigation into the propriety of literary representation of historical catastrophe. Consideration of our own role as readers serving as witnesses to an event that has marked itself indelibly in the aesthetic history of the twentieth century.
JWST429B
Advanced Topics in Jewish Studies; Classical Arabic Philosophy by Muslims and Jews
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as PHIL428B. Credit granted for PHIL428B or JWST429B. This course is an introduction to classical Arabic philosophy from the ninth to the thirteenth centuries of the Christian era. But unlike most courses on this topic, we shall not be reading philosophy soley by Muslims but also by Jews (and maybe Christians). In a sense, the course is best described by the title of the book by Dimitri Gutas, "Greek Thought, Arabic Culture".
JWST459M
Readings in Medieval Hebrew; Moses Maimonides' Religious and Ethical Thought
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as PHIL428M. Credit granted for PHIL428M or JWST459M.

A seminar in the philosophy of Moses Maimonides, the great medieval Jewish religious thinker. The course will focus on the disputed questions in the interpretation of Maimonides, such as his views on Divine attributes, creation, providence, prophecy, the rationale of the Law, moral and intellectual perfection, and the limitations of human knowledge. No knowledge of Hebrew or Arabic is required.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC160
Introduction to Landscape Architecture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
History, theory, philosophy and current practice of the profession of landscape architecture. Explores the interactive relationship between humans and their environment by examining people's perceptions of and changing attitude towards the landscape, as well as, an examination of how these are related to ecological and cultural influences.
LASC
Certificate in Latin American Studies
LASC234
Issues in Latin American Studies I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as: SPAN234, PORT234.
Credit only granted for: LASC234, SPAN234, or PORT234.
Interdisciplinary study of major issues in Latin America and the Caribbean, including Latin America's cultural mosaic, migration and urbanization. Democratization and the role of religions. Taught in English.
LASC234H
Issues in Latin American Studies I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as: SPAN234, PORT234.
Credit only granted for: LASC234, SPAN234, or PORT234.
Interdisciplinary study of major issues in Latin America and the Caribbean, including Latin America's cultural mosaic, migration and urbanization. Democratization and the role of religions. Taught in English.
LASC348E
Special Topics in Latin American Studies; Caribbean Literature in English
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as ENGL362. Credit granted for ENGL362 or LASC348E.
LGBT
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Studies
LGBT265
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Restriction: Must not have completed ENGL265.
Also offered as: ENGL265.
Credit only granted for: ENGL265 or LGBT265.
Exploration of literary and cultural expressions of sexuality and gender. Study of a range of historical periods and literary genres, such as essay, poetry, novel, drama, film. Topics include sexual norms and dissidence, gender identity and expression, the relationship between aesthetic forms and sexual subjectivity. Interpretation of texts particularly through the lens of queer theory. Examination of how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference, including race and class.
LING
Linguistics Department Site
LING240
Language and Mind
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Additional information: Required for Linguistics majors and recommended for students in related fields.
The study of language as a cognitive phenomenon. Focus on mastering the concepts and technical skills required for further courses in linguistics. Ways of representing people's knowledge of their native language, ways in which that knowledge is attained naturally by children, and how it is used in speaking and listening. Additional topics may include: animal communication, language and the brain, language and thought.
MUSC
School of Music Department Site
MUSC130
Survey of Music Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
A study of the principles upon which music is based, and an introduction to the musical repertory performed in America today.
MUSC130H
Survey of Music Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
A study of the principles upon which music is based, and an introduction to the musical repertory performed in America today.
For general honors students only.
MUSC130S
Survey of Music Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Restriction: Must not be in any of the following programs (Music (Professional Program); Music Education).
A study of the principles upon which music is based, and an introduction to the musical repertory performed in America today.
Restricted to College Park Scholars - Arts.
MUSC205
History of Popular Music, 1950-Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A historical survey of rock music (blues, rock, soul, metal, rap, etc.) from circa 1950 to the present, with emphasis on popular music as music and popular music as social history.
MUSC210
The Impact of Music on Life
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET210 or MUSC210.
Formerly: MUET210.
Music as a part of culture. Materials drawn from traditions throughout the globe to illustrate issues of historical and contemporary significance, including the impact of race, class and gender on the study of music.
MUSC215
World Popular Musics and Identity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET200 or MUSC215.
Formerly: MUET200.
Focus on popular musics in different cultures with an emphasis on cross-cultural comparisons and analysis of how musics and identity intersect.
MUSC220
Selected Musical Cultures of the World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP
Credit only granted for: MUET220 or MUSC220.
Formerly: MUET220.
A survey of selected musical cultures of the world, such as India, Japan, China, Indonesia, West Africa, Eastern Europe and the Near East.
PERS
Persian Department Site
PERS283
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Introduction to Iranian cinema, society, and culture. Taught in English
Also offered as FILM298B. Credit granted for PERS283 or FILM283.
PERS371
Introduction to Persian Literature in Translation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Introduction to classical and modern canons of Persian literature in historical, esthetic, and social context. Taught in English.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL100
Introduction to Philosophy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
An introduction to the literature, problems, and methods of philosophy either through a study of some of the main figures in philosophic thought or through an examination of some of the central and recurring problems of philosophy.
PHIL140
Contemporary Moral Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
The uses of philosophical analysis in thinking clearly about such widely debated moral issues as abortion, euthanasia, homosexuality, pornography, reverse discrimination, the death penalty, business ethics, sexual equality, and economic justice.
PHIL209A
Philosophical Issues; Bioethics: Regulating Right and Wrong
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU or DSSP
PHIL209E
Philosophical Issues; Happiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
This course examines the nature of happiness and its role in the good human life through the lens of both philosophy and psychology.
PHIL209I
Philosophical Issues: Spooky Action at a Distance: Where Physics meets Metaphysics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Einstein believed physics should represent a "reality in space and time,free from spooky action at a distance" and worried that quantum theory failed that test. This course will investigate whether Einstein was right.
PHIL209N
Know Thyself: Wisdom Through Cognitive Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
How do we improve our decision-making and overcome our weaknesses and biases? Theory and data from cognitive science regarding these shortcomings will be reviewed, and strategies for addressing them proposed. Students will consider how the findings impact various facets of human life.
PHIL236
Philosophy of Religion
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: RELS236.
Credit only granted for: PHIL236 or RELS236.
A philosophical study of some of the main problems of religious thought the nature of religious experience, the justification of religious belief, the conflicting claims of religion and science, and the relation between religion and morality.
PHIL245
Political and Social Philosophy I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
A critical examination of such classical political theories as those of Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, and such contemporary theories as those of Hayek, Rawls, and recent Marxist thinkers.
PHIL250H
Philosophy of Science I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Main issues in the philosophy of science. Special attention to the ways scientific developments have influenced the philosophy of science and how philosophy of science has influenced scientific progress. Case studies of selected historical episodes in which science and philosophy have interacted significantly, focusing on the physical, biological, or social sciences.
PHIL428B
Topics in the History of Philosophy; Classical Arabic Philosophy by Muslims and Jews
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as JWST429B. Credit granted for PHIL428B or JWST429B. This course is an introduction to classical Arabic philosophy from the ninth to the thirteenth centuries of the Christian era. But unlike most courses on this topic, we shall not be reading philosophy solely by Muslims but also by Jews (and maybe Christians). In a sense, the course is best described by the title of the book by Dimitri Gutas, "Greek Thought, Arabic Culture".
PHIL428M
Topics in the History of Philosophy; Moses Maimonides' Religious and Ethical Thought
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as JWST459M. Credit granted for PHIL428M or JWST459M.

A seminar in the philosophy of Moses Maimonides, the great medieval Jewish religious thinker. The course will focus on the disputed questions in the interpretation of Maimonides, such as his views on Divine attributes, creation, providence, prophecy, the rationale of the Law, moral and intellectual perfection, and the limitations of human knowledge. No knowledge of Hebrew or Arabic is required.
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS120
Islamic Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: HIST120.
Credit only granted for: HIST120 or RELS120.
Introduction to society and culture in the Middle East since the advent of Islam: as a personal and communal faith; as artistic and literary highlights of intellectual and cultural life; and as the interplay between politics and religion under the major Islamic regimes.
RELS170
Greek and Roman Mythology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Also offered as: CLAS170.
Credit only granted for: CLAS170 or RELS170.
Additional information: This course cannot be taken for language credit.
An introduction to the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome. This cours is particularly recommended for students planning to major in foreign languages, English, history, the fine arts, or journalism. Taught in English.
RELS289I
What is Religion?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVCC, SCIS
Draws upon examples from a wide variety of religious traditions to explore the question of what religion is and how to best understand it. Engagement with diverse approaches to religion including phenomenology and the study of "the sacred"; sociology and the study of religious communities; and questions of religious experience, ritual, and identity formation.
RELS289J
New Explorations in Religious Studies; Jerusalem in Antiquities
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Also offered as JWST289J. Credit will be granted for JWST289J or RELS289J.

The questions of sacred space through the topic of Jerusalem are explored. The study of Jerusalem's history as a holy city reveals the many ways by which sacred space is constructed. It will also examine the development of places that continue to hold great sanctity in Judaism (the Western Wall), Christianity (the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Mount of Olives), and Islam (the Dome of the Rock and the Al-Aqsa Mosque on the Haram ash-Sharif).
RUSS
Russian Department Site
RUSS222
Masterworks of Russian Literature II
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Introduction to the classics of Russian literature in translation, beginning with the end of the nineteenth century and concluding with contemporary works. Taught in English.
RUSS361
Dostoevsky's Life and Works
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Credit only granted for: RUSS361 or RUSS298P.
Formerly: RUSS298P.
A study of Dostoevsky's major works with reference to related developments in Russian and European culture, literary criticism, and intellectual history. Interdisciplinary investigation of Dostoevsky's contemporary relevance and tremendous international popularity.
SLLC
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department Site
SLLC286
Living the Good Life: Chinese Philosophy in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Additional information: Taught in English.
Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi and other Chinese thinkers who lived more than 2,000 years ago would argue that the contemporary Western emphasis on self-discovery (Find yourself) and self-acceptance has led you astray. See what they have to say and discuss what relevance it has for the modern world as we study how early Chinese thinkers wrestled with questions of existence, morality, and governance. No previous knowledge of Chinese philosophy and history will be assumed and no prerequisites are required. We will discuss ideas that are both historical and relevant to students' lives. What is "the Way"? How do we cultivate spontaneity? Is there a stable self? How can we be more alive? These are questions important for ancient kings but also for UMD students choosing a major, or wondering how ARHU can benefit them.
SLLC299P
Special Topics in World Cultures; Behavior of the Rich and Powerful, Past and Present
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Through the study of XV and XVI century courtesy literature, in this course we will explore the various forms of behavior of the rich and powerful of the Italian Renaissance, an era that is much closer to our contemporary world than we might initially think, especially in regard to the way political and influential figures act in social situations and the image of themselves they present to others. What can we learn from observing and comparing the behavior of the rich and powerful of the past and present? In the public arena of these two worlds, does appearance matter more than truth?
SPAN
Spanish Department Site
SPAN207
Reading and Writing in Spanish
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B+ in SPAN203; or must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in SPAN204; or must have appropriate Foreign Language Placement Test (FLPT) score.
Selected readings with emphasis on reading comprehension and the development of reading strategies. Work in composition writing and a review of selected grammatical topics. Complements material of SPAN204.
SPAN234
Issues in Latin American Studies I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as: PORT234, LASC234.
Credit only granted for: SPAN234, PORT234, or LASC234.
Interdisciplinary study of major issues in Latin America and the Caribbean, including Latin America's cultural mosaic, migration and urbanization. Democratization and the role of religions. Taught in English.
SPAN234H
Issues in Latin American Studies I
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP
Also offered as: PORT234, LASC234.
Credit only granted for: SPAN234, PORT234, or LASC234.
Interdisciplinary study of major issues in Latin America and the Caribbean, including Latin America's cultural mosaic, migration and urbanization. Democratization and the role of religions. Taught in English.
Open to Honor students only.
SPAN303
Approaches to Cultural Materials in the Hispanic World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN301; and must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in SPAN311 or SPAN316.
Development of proficiency in critical thought through the reading, viewing, and analytical discussion of major genres and styles of cultural materials selected from Spanish-speaking world. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN331
Spanish Culture, Civilization and Literature I: Medieval Times
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
The exploration of cultures of the Iberian Peninsula from its origins until the 15th century as well as the study of historical and political events that gave rise to the Spanish state. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN333
Spanish Culture, Civilization and Literature III: Modern Times
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU
Prerequisite: SPAN303; and (SPAN311 or SPAN316).
An overview of cultural and literary production of Spain from the late 17th century through the present day, exploring the production of literary texts in their socio-historical, political, religious and cultural contexts and development. Taught in Spanish.
SPAN361
Latin American Literatures and Cultures I: From Pre-Columbian to Colonial Times