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Courses - Fall 2017
AASP
African American Studies Department Site
AASP187
The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Recommended: AASP100.
Students will examine the birth of the racial caste system following the abolition of slavery, the parallels between the racial hierarchy of the Jim Crow system and contemporary mass incarceration, and the rise of the prison industrial complex as a multi-billon business which thrives on the oppression of low-income populations and poor communities of color.
AASP189I
HIV/AIDS in a Global Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, DVUP, SCIS
AMST
American Studies Department Site
AMST260
American Culture in the Information Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: AMST260 or AMST298I.
Formerly: AMST298I.
Examines the ways in which content and form of public information interact with the culture, families & individuals.
ANSC
Animal Science
ANSC227
Eating with Eyes Wide Open
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Students will investigate the tension that is created by trade-offs that, knowingly or not, are made by consumers relative to agricultural production methods and dietary choices. Course will inform students about their food supply so they can make informed decisions and practice intentional or informed eating.
ANTH
Anthropology Department Site
ANTH264
Immigration Policy, Immigrant Lives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An examination of the phenomenon of international migration, or immigration. Students develop awareness of how immigration has been framed in the general public and examined by social science disciplines, most prominently anthropology. Examination of case studies of different immigrant groups in distinct geographic contexts will illuminate the varied incorporation experiences of immigrants into U.S. society.
Also offered as IMMR219C. Credit granted for ANTH264 or IMMR219C.
ANTH265
Anthropology of Global Health
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An overview of the growing field of global health including health care systems, medical practices, ideas about illness in cross-cultural contexts, issues of health development, global health inequity, and human rights issues. The course will focus on the history of global health, the critique of major international health agencies and their development paradigms, and the political economy of social inequalities and health.
ANTH266
Changing Climate, Changing Cultures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Explore past, present, and future interactions between humans and climate. Discussions, methods-oriented activities, and case study analyses provide students a foundation for appreciating the role of anthropology in understanding, responding to, and preparing for climate change.
AOSC
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
AOSC123
Causes and Implications of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Also offered as: GEOL123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Formerly: METO123.
Responsible policy and decision making on issues related to the global environment requires understanding of the basic scientific issues, relationships between the geophysical and biological sciences, the impacts on regional and global endeavors, and the political manner in which humans respond. This course embodies an integrated introduction to the broad scientific and social aspects of the global change problem.
AOSC200
Weather and Climate
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL (if taken with AOSC201) or DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: MATH107, MATH110, or MATH115.
Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in AOSC201.
Formerly: METO200.
Broad survey of the state of knowledge and problems of atmospheric science. Origin and structure of the atmosphere, meteorological observations, weather maps, forecasting, satellites, energetics, wind, general circulation, storms, severe weather, climate change, air pollution.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
ARCH
Architecture Department Site
ARCH270
Design in Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Case studies and hands-on design projects ranging in scale from a product to a building to give students insight into the process by which architects work both individually and collaboratively to put disciplinary knowledge and expertise into practice to shape our built environment.

A Fearless Ideas Course from the Academy for Innovation & Entrepreneurship (AIE): http://ter.ps/iamFEARLESS Click here for more informationon the Fearless Ideas Courses.
AREC
Agricultural and Resource Economics Department Site
AREC200
The Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem: Intersection of Science, Economics, and Policy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
The Chesapeake Bay is one of the most studied and monitored ecosystems in the world. To develop effective policies to restore this system to a healthier status requires integrating what we know about the biological and physical properties of the system with our understanding of the human dimension. Issues such as achieving nutrient reduction goals, restoring healthy blue crab and oyster fisheries in the bay will be used to demonstrate how economics interacts with science to guide policies that can be effective in achieving Bay restoration goals.
ASTR
Astronomy Department Site
ASTR230
The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Prerequisite: Must have math eligibility of MATH115 or higher; or MATH113.
Have you ever wondered if humans will ever terraform Mars or Europa so we could live there without a spacesuit? Has it ever crossed your mind how lucky you are that you live on a water-rich planet with an oxygen-rich atmosphere? Have you ever suspected novelists and scriptwriters of creating ridiculous planets that violate scientific laws? Does the fate of our planet's thin biosphere keep you up at night? How common is life in the Universe? These are difficult questions, but armed with the right information, you can answer all of them. The Science and Fiction of Planetary Systems will help you develop a deeper understanding of why planets are the way they are. Along the way, you'll see examples of mistakes made in classic science fiction movies, novels and short stories and get the chance to invent your own plausible planets!
BMGT
Business and Management Department Site
BMGT289A
Social Enterprise: Changing the World through Innovation and Transformative Action
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
BMGT289B
How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit will be granted for only one of the following: BMBT289B or HONR289P. Course will meet on occasional Monday evenings from 6:30-9:15pm for assessments and guest speaker presentations. Specific dates will be available by the start of the semester.
BMGT289D
Frauds, Scams, and Thefts: What, How and Why?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
BMGT289E
Entrepreneurial Thinking for Non-Business Majors: How Not to Miss Great Opportunities Your Life Throws at You
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
BMGT289I
Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Why do smart managers make flawed decisions? Why do managers keep believing they have made the right choice, even with disastrous results staring them in the face? Why Good Managers Make Bad Decisions will address how evidence-based management and other decisionmaking tools can be used to uncover hidden assumptions in the corner offices of great corporations.
BSCI
Biological Sciences Program Department Site
BSCI126
Pollinators in Crisis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
We will dissect the pollinator crisis, and in the process learn about insects, about the interaction of organisms in complex ecosystems, and about the human-nature interface. Students will work in groups that specialize in an aspect of pollinator biology and their challenges. Instruction will target methods for collecting information, interpretation of scientific information and the professional presentation of findings.
BSCI135
Amazing Green: Plants that Transformed the World
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
An interactive way to learn about plants and science, focusing on how plants have changed human history, the biology of their growth, and the science behind their use.
Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
BSCI223
General Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI170 and BSCI171; or BSCI105.
Fundamental concepts in morphology, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to medicine, the food industry and biotechnology.
(Sponsoring Dept.: CBMG). Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.
BSCI283
Principles of Microbiology
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNL, SCIS
Prerequisite: BSCI207 and BSCI222.
Credit only granted for: BSCI223 or BSCI283.
Additional information: Priority given to BSCI, BCHM and CHEM majors.
Introduction to microorganisms designed for science majors. Genetic principles underlying microbial abilities; microbial structure-function relationships; metabolism, physiology, and ecology of microorganisms; interactions between microorganisms (including pathogens) and their hosts.
BSGC
Global Communities
BSGC101
(Perm Req)
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be in Global Communities Living-Learning program.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the historical evolution and contemporary significance of growing interconnectedness in the world. We debate different perspectives on globalization and its impact on social, political, economic and cultural issues.
BSOS
Behavioral and Social Sciences
BSOS289I
Playing the Market: Managing Risk and Using Technical Analysis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Through readings, class discussion, guest lecturers, anda simulated portfolio construction and class trading competition, this course will introduce students to investing and trading, with special emphasis on the field of technical analysis. The technical approach to the markets focuses largelly on the analysis of price and volume patterns as indicators of stock trends. Students will learn how to evaluate companies using internet sources and a technical analysis program. Each student will be expected to use a set of trading rules to apply to theirtrading ofa virtual $100,000 margin portfolio and to manage risk. Students will develop an accurate view of the risks of benefits of trading stocks and an appreciation of the complexities involved in the technical approach to trading stocks. The course assumes no prior knowledge of the stock market.
BSST
Terrorism Studies
BSST334
States of Emergency
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Students will explore the manner in which crises unfold from the perspective of a variety of emergency response disciplines, including: emergency management, law enforcement, intelligence analysis, cyber analysis, risk communication, health and human services, and emergency psychiatry/psychology. Students will participate in a semester-long simulation of an unfolding terrorist attack.
CCJS
Criminology and Criminal Justice Department Site
CCJS225
Responses to Violence
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Conflict is unfortunately resolved through violence in a number of settings. It ranges from interpersonal to international in its scope. This course investigates the strengths and weakness of a number of resolutions to reducing violence over the course of history using both state centered and informal control.
CCJS325
Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: CCJS325 or CCJS498R.
Formerly: CCJS498R.
The trafficking of human beings in its historical, legal, economic, political and social contexts. Scope of the global problem, different forms of human trafficking, and regional trends and practices. Roles of government, the international community and individual actors. Strategies to combat trafficking.
CLAS
Classics Department Site
CLAS275
Why do we laugh?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
An introduction to the breadth and complexity of humor's role in society. Students will familiarize themselves with the explanations that various disciplines have offered about what makes us laugh, and analyze the major impact humor has in our understanding of who we are and how we see our world.
COMM
Communication Department Site
COMM385
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: COMM385 or COMM498I (Spring 2014).
Formerly: COMM498I (Spring 2014).
Explores contemporary theories of influence and their implications for communication practice. Topics include power and influence, logical theory, rhetorical theory, persuasion theory, framing theory, social influence theory, and propagation of influence in mediated social networks.
CPMS
College Park Scholars-Media, Self and Society
CPMS225
Analyzing Media Practice through Theory
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPMS100.
Restriction: Must be in the Scholars Media, Self & Society Program.
Formerly: CPSP222.
Media analysis investigating patterns of ownership, the working of media organizations, patterns of coverage and the nature of audiences.
CPSS
College Park Scholars-Science, Technology and Society
CPSS225
College Park Scholars Capstone: Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS100.
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program.
Formerly: CPSP227.
Exploration and understanding of ways science and technology shape and are shaped by society.
CPSS240
College Park Scholars: Science, Technology & Society - Service-Learning Practicum
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Prerequisite: CPSS101; or permission of instructor.
Restriction: Matriculation into the College Park Scholars Science, Technology & Society (CPSS) program; or permission of instructor.
Supervised Service-Learning practicum in issues related to science, technology and society.
Most of the class times will be spent at area Prince George's schools with partnering robotics teams. Consult the class requirements and locations provided in the syllabus at the beginning of the class.
ECON
Economics Department Site
ECON111
Thinking Like an Economist
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Sophomore standing or lower; or permission of BSOS-Economics department.
An introduction to the modes of thought of economics. Use of simple standard tools of economics to analyze important problems that arise frequently in public policy, the news media, and in daily life. An emphasis on how economists predict what choices societies make and how economists analyze whether those are good choices. Practical application of a variety of economic tools leading to a focus on the essential unity underlying these analytical tools, viewing economics as a discipline that applies a core methodology in different ways in different situations.
ECON181
Incentives for Sustainability: An Economist's Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
How does society balance the benefits of environmental protection and preservation against the costs? Though some might say that the environment is priceless, economists recognize that every action involves trade-offs. This course investigates sustainability through comparing costs and benefits. From this perspective, other questions arise: How can we design policies that incentivize sustainable choices? Why might usual market functioning fail to achieve sustainability? Do we need to put a price on the environment in order to protect it? How do we measure an economy's "success"? This course explores the answers to these and other related questions from an economist's perspective.
EDCI
Curriculum and Instruction Department Site
EDCI288C
Special Topics in Teacher Education; The Power of the Tongue
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Please check Canvas for room location.
EDCI288W
Special Topics in Teacher Education; Forbidden Books: Censorship of Children's and Young Adult Literature
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
EDHD
Education, Human Development Department Site
EDHD231
Inside 21st Century Creativity: How Creative Ideas, Concepts, and Products are Generated
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Mechanisms of the creative mind. Psychological, social, sociological, developmental, cultural, educational, genetic and neural based roots of creativity.
EDSP
Education, Special Department Site
EDSP289I
Disability: From Stigma and Sideshow to Mainstream and Main Street
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
ENEE
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Site
ENEE200
Technology and Consequences: Engineering, Ethics, and Humanity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
What makes a technology socially responsible? At UMD, the Fearless Ideas campaign asks us to aim our enthusiasm for technology at big real problems. At the same time, we are coming to appreciate the increasingly complex nature of technological systems as they become integrated into all forms of infrastructure, we realize they may be unpredictable, interdependent on social and biological systems, and have unintended consequences. In this midst of this complexity, people make decisions with far reaching impacts. How then do we follow our passion for technology and innovation but also stay skeptical in a way that allows us to consider the potential and shortcomings of technology? Designed for both engineering and non-engineering students wishing to explore and assess the impact of engineering technology on society and the role of society in generating that technology.
ENES
Engineering Science
ENES210
Entrepreneurial Opportunity Analysis and Decision-Making in 21st Century Technology Ventures
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
This multi-disciplinary course helps students learn the principles of entrepreneurial opportunity analysis and decision-making in an increasingly dynamic and technically-inclined society. Emphasis is placed on how aspiring technology entrepreneurs can develop their entrepreneurial perspectives to develop winning entrepreneurial plans for their future ventures.
ENGL
English Department Site
ENGL130
Race and the Cultural Politics of Blood: A Historical Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL130 or ENGL237.
Formerly: ENGL237.
Exploration of race, as term and concept, at three different historical times and from three different perspectives, through the reading of three stories: William Shakespeare's drama Othello, Aphra Behn's novella Oroonoko, and the short story Benito Cereno by Herman Melville. Exploration of the importance of context in interpretation. Study of how a concept for rationalizing human difference appears and adapts, fuses and fades away, relocates and is repurposed. How understanding of the particular situation of the concept, its context, changes our reading of the story.
ENGL140
American Fictions: Cross-Examining U.S. Literature, History, and Politics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL140 or ENGL289Y.
Formerly: ENGL289Y.
Major works of American literature explored in relation to major texts and developments of U.S. history, culture and politics. Special attention to global contexts and complications of "American" literature and history. Key historical and political issues include human rights, democratic principles, independence, revolution, slavery, removal, immigration, free speech, labor rights, civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, economic globalization, technology and digital innovation, and the role literature and the humanities may play in fostering various forms of responsible citizenship.
ENGL150
Uncanny Technologies: Monsters, Droids, and Vampires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Credit only granted for: ENGL150 or ENGL289T.
Formerly: ENGL289T.
Explores dark, uncertain borders between human and nonhuman, natural and unnatural, life and death. What literature teaches about new technologies that seek to represent or replicate human experience. Examination of a series of nineteenth-century American, French, German, and British novels and stories from Frankenstein (1818) to Dracula (1897) featuring recently introduced media and inventions such as photographs, phonographs, automata, and motion pictures that are concerned, like works of literature, with recording and reproducing human consciousness and human body.
ENMA
Engineering, Materials Department Site
ENMA150
Materials of Civilization
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
The discovery of new materials has shaped history and built civilizations. The utilization, properties and production techniques of materials from the Bronze Age up through modern times and into the future will be traced. These materials are explained by considering their atomic structure, the binding forces between atoms and their arrangement, and how controlling the structure controls the materials properties.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
FMSC
Family Science Department Site
FMSC170
Future of Families: Issues and Controversies
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: FMSC170 or FMSC298F.
Formerly: FMSC298F.
Examination of current trends and controversial issues in family life, including issues of marriage, reproductive technologies, adoption, child custody, remarriage, and marital violence.
FMSC190
Man Up! Where Are The Fathers?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An examination of changing fatherhood roles, health, and inequality in diverse families. Focus will be on masculinities and disparities among men by race and class; provider role expectations; and trauma and violence faced by men in contemporary society.
GEOG
Geographical Sciences Department Site
GEOG140
Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common i this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.
GEOG330
As the World Turns: Society and Sustainability in a Time of Great Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: GEOG330, GEOG360, or GEOG362.
Formerly: GEOG362.
Cultural geography course on society and sustainability. Culture is the basic building block that is key to sustainability of societies. Course will cover sustainability of societies on different scales, examining local, regional, and worldwide issues. Sustainability will be examined as a key element of environmental sustainability. How societies adjust to rapid world change will be examined as a positive and/or negative factor in sustainability.
GEOL
Geology Department Site
GEOL123
Causes and Consequences of Global Change
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Also offered as: AOSC123.
Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123.
Study of the major components of Earth's climate system and climate change history. Discussion of 21st century climate change prediction, mitigation and adaptation efforts.
GEOL124
(Perm Req)
Evolution of Life and Environment on Planet Earth
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
An exploration of how life has shaped Earth's physical environments, both in the contemporary Earth and over the long course of Earth history. Topics range from evidence for the origin and diversification of life and its impact on Earth environments to the mind-set and methods of the scientists who interpret it, and what those methods tell us about future interactions between life and the environment, both on Earth and in the Solar System.
Restricted to students in the new Carillon Once and Future Planet living learning community.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
GEOL200
Earth's Fury: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsunami
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunami frequently remind us of th dangers associated with living on a constantly changing planet. How do people prepare for these rare but dramatic events? Student will study the science behind earthquakes and volcanoes, how it guides monitoring, forecasting, prevention, and response, and the cultural and ethical aspects of these events.
GVPT
Government and Politics Department Site
GVPT289L
Special Topics in Government and Politics; Religions, Beliefs, and World Affairs
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
GVPT289O
Special Topics in Government and Politics; Racial and Ethnic Politics in the Obama Era
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
HACS
ACES-Cybersecurity
HACS208P
Seminar in Cybersecurity; Beyond Technology, the Policy Implications of Cyberspace
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Restriction: Must be a student in the ACES (Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students) Living-Learning Program.
HIST
History Department Site
HIST133
"God Wills It!" The Crusades in Medieval and Modern Perspectives
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST133, HIST289D, or RELS289D.
Formerly: HIST289D.
An examination of the identities and convictions both of the Western Europeans who participated in the Crusades and of the Easterners (Muslim, Christian, and Jewish) whom they encountered in the Holy Land. Focuses on the era of the first four great Crusades, from about 1095 to 1215. Consideration of the cultural impact of these movements on both Western Europe and the Middle East.
Also offered as RELS289D.
HIST134
Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, and Witches: Famous Trials in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examination of some of the most famous trials in American history and their enduring hold on the imagination.
HIST134S
Spies, Assassins, Martyrs, and Witches: Famous Trials in American History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Examination of some of the most famous trials in American history and their enduring hold on the imagination.
Restricted to students in College Park Scholars-Justice and Legal Thought program.
HIST135
Civil Discourse or Urban Riot: Why Cities Don't (Often) Explode
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
An examination of the mechanisms that promote peaceful co-existence in urban societies and a discussion of how and why city streets sometimes become violent.
Also offered as JWST289E. Credit granted for HIST135 or JWST289E. An examination of the mechanisms that promote peaceful co-existence in urban societies and a discussion of how and why city streets sometimes become violent.
HIST136
Moneyland: Business in American Culture
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Examines the interplay between America's stature as a business society and the public distrust of commerce, big business, and money.
HIST143
Power, Ritual, and Society in Western History
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Credit only granted for: HIST289F or HIST143.
Formerly: HIST289F.
Introduces students to influential works of political thinking, in the Western tradition from classical Antiquity to the present, that treat the relationship between power, ritual, and society. Investigates ritual and its relationships to power, both in reality and the imagination of political thinkers.
HIST289C
Mirror of Democracy: The Golden Age of Athens
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HIST289O
Lawlessness: From Pirates to Body-snatchers, Exploring the Legitimacy of Illicit Activity
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Explores motives of and responses to the lawless behavior of pirates, body snatchers, bandits, vigilantes, smugglers and others worldwide from the 1500s to today.
HIST289Y
Zombies, Fear, and Contagion: A Cultural History of Public Health, Medicine, and Technology
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HLTH
HLTH234
Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure & Impact.
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVCC, SCIS
Using a global perspective, this course teaches students to be critical consumers of current and historical health communication interventions. It also provides students with the skills to develop media interventions that target specific and general populations. Students will discover the array of diverse media messages that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.
HONR
HONR208L
Honors Seminar; Justice Matters: Law, Literature, and Film
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR208M
Honors Seminar: Utopia and Dystopia: Reality and Relevance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR208R
Leonardo and the Science of Art
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR218B
Honors Seminar; Making a Difference: The Lives and Words of Leaders Who Shape Our Time
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR218C
Honors Seminar; Love Me, Hate Me, Use Me, Save Me: Our Conflicting Views of
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
HONR218J
Honors Seminar; Sustainability and Development: From the Individual to the Global
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR218P
Honors Seminar; Immigration: Personal Stories and Policy Changes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HONR228J
Honors Seminar; The Caribbean Amidst the Global: Interrogating Issues of Pirates and Piracy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
HONR229L
Honors Seminar; Climate Change: Science, Economics, and Governance
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR238Q
Honors Seminar; Nuclear Waste: The Other Consequences of Nuclear Weapons
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR248J
Honors Seminar; A Most Human Nation
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
HONR259G
Honors Seminar; Fairness, Inequality, and Democracy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR259K
Honors Seminar; Global Inequality: Research and Practice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR268L
Honors Seminar: United States Immigration Issues
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
HONR268N
(Perm Req)
Honors Seminar; Cracking the Secrets of the Universe Using Computers: Re-discovering the Higgs and Searching for Invisible Matter
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS or DSSP, SCIS
This course is part of a two-semester Honors research seminar. Part two of this series will be offered in the Spring 2017 Semester. For more information about the course, please visit physics.umd.edu/courses/Honr268N/. For permission to enroll, please contact Dr. Shabnam Jabeen at Jabeen@umd.edu.
HONR269T
Honors Seminar: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy toward Afghanistan
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This is a Global Classroom course. There will be approximately 2-4 weeks where this course will meet on an alternative day of the week for videoconferencing meetings with students in Kabul, Afghanistan instead of meeting at its normal weekly time on Thursday nights (the exact dates are TBA).
HONR278D
Honors Seminar; National Security Dilemmas
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
HONR278K
Honors Seminar; Evolutionary Processes in Health Medicine
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR279L
Honors Seminar; The Problem of Prejudice: Overcoming Impediments to Global Peace and Justice
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
HONR288O
Honors Seminar: Why Do Things Fail?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR289N
Honors Seminar; Physical Activity in Health and Human Performance: From Fat to Fit to Olympic Gold
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
HONR289P
Honors Seminar; How Do Innovators Think?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit will be granted for only one of the following: BMBT289B or HONR289P. Course will meet on occasional Monday evenings from 6:30-9:15pm for assessments and guest speaker presentations. Specific dates will be available by the start of the semester.
HONR299I
Honors Seminar; The Practice of Science in an Age of Truthiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
IMMR
Immigration Studies
IMMR219C
Special Topics in Immigration and Migration Studies; Anthropology and Immigration
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Also offered as ANTH264. Credit granted for ANTH264 or IMMR219C.

An examination of the phenomenon of international migration, or immigration. Students develop awareness of how immigration has been framed in the general public and examined by social science disciplines, most prominently anthropology. Examination of case studies of different immigrant groups in distinct geographic contexts will illuminate the varied incorporation experiences of immigrants into U.S. society.
ISRL
Israel Studies
ISRL289I
The Israeli/Palestinian Conflict: Fundamental Questions
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Why are Palestinians and Israelis unable to resolve their conflict? Will they ever? Using insights and methodologies from a variety of disciplines and contrasting interpretations of history, this course will examine why the Palestinian-Israeli conflict continues, why it has become so central in world politics and how it connects with other global issues.
JOUR
Journalism Department Site
JOUR289E
Media Law and Ethics in the Digital Age
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
This course is intended for non-journalism majors. Explore the First Amendment, libel, privacy, FOIA and copyright as they have evolved in the digital news age of bloggers, tweeters and citizen journalists. The course will cover fundamental legal and ethical concepts as well as practical application.
JOUR289I
Information 3.0: Exploring Technological Tools
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
This innovative course blends face-to-face and virtual meetings with state-of-the art technology that includes mobile devices, a custom course app, and social media to address the overwhelming amounts of information from an increasing number of technologies. Instead of traditional written exams assignments, students learn and apply new ways to seek, select, share & learn from digital media. Students combine text and tweets with audio and video to address the sociological and psychological benefits and consequences of emerging technologies in school, work, and play.
JOUR289J
Probing War: Investigative Narratives and American Conflicts
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
In this course, we will explore the realities of war through the work of journalists who pushed beyond the daily headlines, some risking life and limb, to challenge official versions and document uncomfortable realities about American conflicts.
JWST
Jewish Studies Department Site
JWST289E
New Explorations in Jewish Studies; Civil Discourse or Urban Riot: Why Cities Don't (Often) Explode
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, DVUP, SCIS
Also offered as HIST135. Credit granted for HIST135 or JWST289E. An examination of the mechanisms that promote peaceful co-existence in urban societies and a discussion of how and why city streets sometimes become violent.
JWST289J
Jerusalem in Antiquity: The History of Sacred Space in a Holy City
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVUP, SCIS
Also offered as RELS289J. Credit will be granted for JWST289J or RELS289J.

The questions of sacred space through the topic of Jerusalem are explored. The study of Jerusalem's history as a holy city reveals the many ways by which sacred space is constructed. It will also examine the development of places that continue to hold great sanctity in Judaism (the Western Wall), Christianity (the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Mount of Olives), and Islam (the Dome of the Rock and the Al-Aqsa Mosque on the Haram ash-Sharif).
KNES
Kinesiology Department Site
KNES289R
Topical Investigations; Hoop Dreams: Black Masculinity and Sport
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
KNES289W
Topical Investigations; The Cybernetic Human
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Can the profound and rapid technological advances experienced in the 21st century change what it means to be human or the nature of humanity? Emergent technologies, new materials, increased computer power,engineering innovations, and groundbreaking work in the sciences of cognition and action provide myriad opportunities for repairing and enhancing the human body and brain. Examines the ethical, social, and technological implications of an increasing synergism of technology and the body in sports and the arts, at work or home, rehabilitating the body and the brain, and society at large.
LARC
Landscape Architecture Department Site
LARC151
Urban Agriculture: Designing and Assessing Edible Landscapes
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Students will examine the growing development of urban agriculture and edible landscapes. Urban agriculture has seen a recent growth and interest in cities across the globe. From Paris to New York, from Baltimore to Detroit, urban agriculture is an emerging land use to address a variety of needs. Redevelopment, food deserts, community engagement and environmental justice are just some of the issues and topics that are connected to the recent growth of urban agriculture. This course will take a critical examination of urban agriculture's contribution to the food system, its input and outputs in the urban landscape, and the planning and design of urban agriculture and edible landscapes.
LARC152
Greening Cities: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Who Cares?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: LARC152 or PLSC289I.
Formerly: PLSC289I.
"Greening Cities" can have many interpretations: improving or adding urban economic activity, realizing energy efficiency, greening urban transport systems, etc. An important component of livable and sustainable cities and metropolitan ecosystems are the plants and landscapes that are inhabited by plants. With the majority of humans now living in cities, a survey of urban ecosystem principles and an examination of design and planning strategies for plant and landscape resources in urban and metropolitan regions is critical.
PHIL
Philosophy Department Site
PHIL209E
Philosophical Issues; Happiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
This course examines the nature of happiness and its role in the good human life through the lens of both philosophy and psychology.
PHIL209I
Philosophical Issues: Spooky Action at a Distance: Where Physics meets Metaphysics
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Einstein believed physics should represent a "reality in space and time,free from spooky action at a distance" and worried that quantum theory failed that test. This course will investigate whether Einstein was right.
PHIL209N
Know Thyself: Wisdom Through Cognitive Science
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSHU, SCIS
How do we improve our decision-making and overcome our weaknesses and biases? Theory and data from cognitive science regarding these shortcomings will be reviewed, and strategies for addressing them proposed. Students will consider how the findings impact various facets of human life.
PHYS
Physics Department Site
PHYS105
Physics for Decision Makers: Global Energy Crisis
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
This marquee course will consider the global energy crisis from a scientific perspective. Topics include basic laws of energy and thermodynamics, their effects on energy production and distribution, greenhouse gas, global warming and policy options for decision makers. This course is aimed at the non-science major.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
PHYS199M
The Manhattan Project
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS or DSNS, SCIS
This course explores the development of the atomic bomb during the Manhattan project. Nuclear Physics is introduced in a historical context from the discovery of radioactivity in 1896 to the discovery of nuclear fission in Germany in 1938; this historical approach allows students to understand how scientific knowledge is built up over time.

A Marquee Science and Technology Course designed for Non-Science Majors: http://www.marqueecourses.umd.edu/* Click here for more Marquee course information.
PLCY
Public Policy
PLCY201
Leadership for the Common Good
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS or DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PLCY201 or PUAF201.
Formerly: PUAF201.
This course is designed to provide undergraduate students an introduction to leadership theory and a chance to practice a core set of practical skills relevant to transformational and collaborative leadership.
Restriction: Must be in the College Park Scholars Public Leadership program; and freshman standing.
PLCY214
(Perm Req)
Leading and Investing in Social Change: Re-defining and Experimenting with Philanthropy
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
Credit only granted for: PLCY214, PUAF214 or PUAF359I.
Formerly: PUAF359I, PUAF214.
Defines philanthropy as an exploration of how one develops a vision of the public good and then deploys resources (including donations, volunteers, and voluntary associations) to achieve an impact.
PLSC
Plant Sciences
PLSC115
How Safe is Your Salad? The Microbiological Safety of Fresh produce
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
Recommended: PLSC100, PLSC101, or BSCI105; or (BSCI170 and BSCI171).
As food is produced in larger quantities and made to travel longer distances, keeping our food safe in this day and age is an ever growing challenge. This course will focus on the question of what it takes to grow and maintain safe fruits and vegetables, as food travels along the path from the farm to your fork. Food safety of fresh produce will be discussed from the public health, agricultural, economical and policy perspectives.
PLSC125
Feeding Nine Billion by 2050: Food Security and Crop Protection
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSNS, SCIS
A big question in global food security is "how can we feed 9 billion people in 2050?" This course will stimulate creative thinking about possible solutions particularly from the crop production perspective. The instructor will introduce the concept of food security and different dimensions of this complex issue, identify major constraints to food security, and discuss scientific approaches that may be used to meet the grand challenge. Emphasis will be placed on topical and controversial issues such as the impact of biofuel production and GM crops on food security, and novel strategies that can enhance crop protection for improving food security.
PSYC
Psychology Department Site
PSYC289D
Living the Good Life: The Psychology of Happiness
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
RELS
Religious Studies
RELS289D
God Wills It! The Crusades in Medieval and Modern Perspective
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Also offered as: HIST133. Credit only granted for: HIST133, HIST289D, or RELS289D.
RELS289I
What is Religion?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, DVCC, SCIS
Draws upon examples from a wide variety of religious traditions to explore the question of what religion is and how to best understand it. Engagement with diverse approaches to religion including phenomenology and the study of "the sacred"; sociology and the study of religious communities; and questions of religious experience, ritual, and identity formation.
RELS289J
New Explorations in Religious Studies; Jerusalem in Antiquities
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Also offered as JWST289J. Credit will be granted for JWST289J or RELS289J.

The questions of sacred space through the topic of Jerusalem are explored. The study of Jerusalem's history as a holy city reveals the many ways by which sacred space is constructed. It will also examine the development of places that continue to hold great sanctity in Judaism (the Western Wall), Christianity (the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Mount of Olives), and Islam (the Dome of the Rock and the Al-Aqsa Mosque on the Haram ash-Sharif).
SLLC
School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department Site
SLLC286
Living the Good Life: Chinese Philosophy in the Modern World
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHU, SCIS
Additional information: Taught in English.
Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi and other Chinese thinkers who lived more than 2,000 years ago would argue that the contemporary Western emphasis on self-discovery (Find yourself) and self-acceptance has led you astray. See what they have to say and discuss what relevance it has for the modern world as we study how early Chinese thinkers wrestled with questions of existence, morality, and governance. No previous knowledge of Chinese philosophy and history will be assumed and no prerequisites are required. We will discuss ideas that are both historical and relevant to students' lives. What is "the Way"? How do we cultivate spontaneity? Is there a stable self? How can we be more alive? These are questions important for ancient kings but also for UMD students choosing a major, or wondering how ARHU can benefit them.
SOCY
Sociology Department Site
SOCY200
Human Societies
Credits: 4
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
A comparative, historical, interdisciplinary study of human socieities that focuses on the main components of human societies, how they are organized, how they change, and how they come to shape our collective social existence.
SOCY224
Why are We Still Talking About Race?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
Exploration of the major debates and assumptions that construct individual perceptions of what race is and how race matters. Sociological and sub-cultural theories will give students a historical and present day frame with which to view race and ethnic relations in the twenty first century.
SOCY225
Women's Jobs, Men's Jobs: How and Why Do They Differ?
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSHS, SCIS
An exploration of critical issues pertaining gender differences in the workplace. Overview of theories explaining why some people do better than the others in the world of work, and discussions of more specific questions relating to women's and men's job opportunities and experiences.
URSP
Urban Studies and Planning
URSP250
The Sustainable City: Exploring Opportunities and Challanges
Credits: 3
Grad Meth: Reg, P-F, Aud
GenEd: DSSP, SCIS
An exploration, through an interdisciplinary approach, of a number of issues related to making cities more sustainable in terms of environmental protection, economic opportunity, and social justice. The course assist students to develop skills in critical analysis and systems thinking and to use those skills in analyzing sustainability related problems and potential solutions, and to expand students' understanding of the political implications of crafting and moving towards a sustainable urban future.